N-logotype-black-wide

OPEN

ATTACHMENTS

 

Ordinary meeting of the

 

Works and Infrastructure Committee

 

Thursday 22 October 2015

Commencing at 9.00am

Wakapuaka Hall

460 State Highway 6

Main Road, Wakapuaka

Nelson

 

ATTACHMENTS UNDER SEPARATE COVER

TABLE OF CONTENTS

PAGE

 

8      Transportation Asset Management Plan 2015-2025

2      A1156705 - Transport Asset Management Plan 2015-2025         2                                  


Transport

Asset Management Plan

2015 - 25

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Part 1

 

 

 
 

 

 


N-logotype-black-wide

 


Quality Assurance Statement

 

Version No.

Date

Description

Prepared by

Reviewed by

Approved by

1

24/3/14

draft for
assets review

R Palmer

Assets Team

A Louverdis

2

5/5/14

draft including financial and work programmes

R Palmer

Assets Team

A Louverdis

3

19/5/14

draft for SLT

R Palmer

SLT

A Louverdis

4

5/6/14

draft for Council workshop

R Palmer

Councillors

A Louverdis

5

18/12/14

Approved by

Council

R Palmer

SLT

A Louverdis

6

15/10/15

Approved by Council to match LTP

R Palmer

Councillors

Council

 

Yellow highlighted text indicates changes to version 5 as a result of the LTP

Blue highlighted text indicates changes to version 5 as a result of the other factors

 

 


CONTENTS PAGE

Part 1

Executive Summary. 1

1................ Introduction.. 12

1.1.                Purpose. 12

1.2.                Plan structure. 12

1.3.                The transport activity. 12

1.4.                The stakeholders 13

1.5.                The end users 14

1.6.                The legislative context 15

1.7.                Strategic context 15

2................ WHAT ARE THE FUTURE DEMAND ISSUES TO CONSIDER?. 19

2.1.                Arterial Traffic. 21

2.2.                Accessibility. 22

2.3.                Sustainability. 23

2.4.                Environmental risks 24

2.5.                Regional considerations 24

2.6.                Funding. 25

2.7.                Funding Risk. 26

2.8.                Transport network resilience. 26

2.9.                Consultation. 27

2.10.             Procurement strategy. 28

2.11.             Prioritisation process for projects 28

3................ What’s the direction?. 29

3.1.                Context 29

3.2.                What are the impacts of moving people and goods?. 31

3.3.                A brief history of street design and improvements programme. 32

3.4.                What are the options?. 33

3.5.                A balanced approach. 34

4................ The delivery of a balanced approach. 35

4.1.                Defining the Targets and the Delivery. 35

4.2.                Local roads, walking, cycling and schools 35

4.3.                Arterial traffic. 48

4.4.                Safety. 50

4.5.                Public transport 54

4.6.                Parking. 55

4.7.                Value for Money principles 57

4.8.                Systems to Measure, Monitor and Report on Performance Indicators 59

Part 2

5................ Technical Performance measures/Asset management Systems/lifecycle. 63

5.1.                Asset lifecycle. 63

5.2.                Asset failure modes 64

5.3.                Roads 64

5.4.                Road structures 67

5.5.                Pedestrian network. 70

5.6.                Cycle network. 74

5.7.                Public Transport 77

5.8.                Traffic control and equipment, street lighting, signs and markings 79

5.9.                Safety. 81

5.10.             Parking. 84

6................ Valuation.. 87

7................ Financial Forecasts and Development Contributions. 88

8................ Risk management. 90

9................ Performance Monitoring and Improvement Plan.. 99

 

List of Appendices

Appendix A             Relevant transport legislation. 102

Appendix B             Nelson’s Strategies and Policies 103

Appendix C             Strategic documents, studies and models providing demand data. 107

Appendix D            Growth indicators 109

Appendix E             How the focus areas link with the government’s, NZ Transport Agency’s and Council’ s strategic documents 142

Appendix F             Definition of Levels of Service. 145

APPENDIX G          STREETS WITHOUT FOOTPATHS. 148

Appendix H            Annual Peak travel time delays on Rocks Road and Waimea Road. 149

Appendix I              Previous LEVEL OF SERVICE and why they have changed. 152

Appendix J              SUMMARY activity descriptions 153

Appendix K             Regional Land Transport Programme 2015-2021. 161

APPENDIX l            10 YEAR LONG TERM PLAN – PROGRAMME. 166

Appendix M            minor improvement and footpaths Priority List 171

Appendix N            Footpath Rehabilitation Sites 175


List of Tables

Table 1.1                 Te Tau Ihu Settlement Bill Proposed Redress 14

Table 1.2                 Council Community Outcomes 17

Table 2.1                 NZ Transport Agency Financial Assistance Rates 25

Table 4.1                 Level of Service Relating to Walking and Cycling. 36

Table 4.2                 Level of Service Relating to Maintenance of Footpaths 36

Table 4.3                 Footpath Rating Descriptions and Summary. 38

Table 4.4                 Level of Service Relating to Local Road Maintenance and Renewals 40

Table 4.5                 Practical seal lives in Nelson. 42

Table 4.6                 Proportion of Road Surface in Nelson by Type and Traffic Volume. 43

Table 4.7                 Level of Service Relating to Efficient Transport System.. 48

Table 4.8                 Level of Service relating to Road Network and Its Services 49

Table 4.9                 Level of Service Relating to Road Safety. 50

Table 4.10              Level of Service Relating to Road Safety at Intersections 51

Table 4.11              Level of Service Relating to Road Safety and Cyclists 52

Table 4.12              Level of Service Relating to Road Safety and Pedestrians 52

Table 4.13              Level of Service Relating to Public Transport Services 54

Table 4.14              Level of Service Relating to Short Stay Parking. 56

Table 4.15              Level of Service Relating to Parking. 56

Table 4.16              Level of Service Relating to Long Stay Parking. 56

Table 4.17              Level of Service Relating to Public Satisfaction. 58

Table 5.1                 Key Stages in the Asset Lifecycle. 63

Table 5.2                 Range of Asset Failure Modes 64

Table 5.3                 Road Surface Valuation. 64

Table 5.4                 Road Basecourse Valuation. 64

Table 5.5                 Road Surface Data Reliability Analysis 66

Table 5.6                 Road Base Data Reliability Analysis 66

Table 5.7                 Bridges Valuation. 67

Table 5.8                 Retaining Wall Valuation. 67

Table 5.9                 Road Structure Data Reliability Analysis 69

Table 5.10              Footpaths Valuation. 70

Table 5.11              Walkways Valuation. 70

Table 5.12              Footway Data Reliability Analysis 72

Table 5.13              Cycleways Valuation. 74

Table 5.14              Cycle Infrastructure Data Reliability Analysis 76

Table 5.15              Fares as at July 2014. 78

Table 5.16              Street Signs Valuation. 79

Table 5.17              Line Marking Valuation. 80

Table 5.18              Streetlights Valuation. 80

Table 5.19              Traffic Signals Valuation. 80

Table 5.20              Car Parking Valuation. 84

Table 5.21              Car Parking Spaces in Nelson and Stoke. 84

Table 5.22              Car Parking Data Reliability Analysis 85

Table 7.1                 Forecasted Subsidised Annual Expenditure. 88

Table 8.1                 Likelihood Ratings (Semi Qualitative Measure) 90

Table 8.2                 Semi-Quantitative Measures of Consequence and Areas of Impact 90

Table 8.3                 Risk Priority Rating (Semi Quantitative) 91

Table 8.4                 Business Risk Schedule. 92

Table 8.5                 Asset Risk Schedule. 96

Table D.1                Peak Hour Volumes 109

Table D.2                Population projections, 2015-2045. 139

Tabel F.1                 Definition of Levels of Service. 145

Table F.2                 Nelson Arterial Traffic Study Network Performance Summary Statistics 147

Table F.3                 Nelson Arterial Traffic Study Network Performance Summary Statistics 147

 


List of Figures

Figure 1.1               Relationship between Statutes and Policy Documents 17

Figure 2.1               Projected Population and Households Growth. 21

Figure 3.1               2013 Residents Survey. 33

Figure 4.2               Main Means of Travel to Work. 38

Figure 4.3               Average Road Roughness Standards by Road Classification. 41

Figure 4.4               Expected Future Resurfacing Costs/Liability. 44

Figure 4.5               Road Network Surface Condition. 45

Figure 4.6               Number of Fatal and Serious Injuries on Local Roads in Nelson. 50

Figure 4.8               Number of Cyclist Crashes in Nelson City. 52

Figure 4.9               Number of crashes involving pedestrians in Nelson City. 53

Figure 4.10             Percentage of Public Dissatisfied with the Transport Activity. 58

Figure 5.1               Remaining Asset Life of Retaining Walls 68

Figure 5.2               Existing and Proposed Cycle Network. 75

Figure 5.3               Zone Structure and Bus Routes 77

Figure D.1               Nelson Arterial Traffic Volumes 110

Figure D.2               Waimea-AM Peak Hour Ending 0900. 111

Figure D.3               Waimea – Peak Hour Ending 1700. 112

Figure D.4               Waimea – Midday Peak Hour Ending 1300. 113

Figure D.5               Waimea – Weekday AM Peak Hour Ending 0900. 114

Figure D.6               Waimea – Weekday PM Peak Hour Ending 1700. 115

Figure D.7               Waimea – Weekday Midday Peak Hour Ending 1300. 116

Figure D.8               Rocks Road -AM Peak Hour Ending 0900. 117

Figure D.9               Rocks Road– PM Peak Hour Ending 1700. 118

Figure D.10            Rocks Road– Midday Peak Hour Ending 1300. 119

Figure D.11            Rocks Road – Weekday AM Peak Hour Ending 0900. 120

Figure D.12            Rocks Road– Weekday PM Peak Hour Ending 1700. 121

Figure D.13            Rocks Road – Weekday Midday Peak Hour Ending 1300. 122

Figure D.14            Main Road Stoke –AM Peak Hour Ending 0900. 123

Figure D.15            Main Road Stoke – PM Peak Hour Ending 1700. 124

Figure D.16            Main Road Stoke – Midday Peak Hour Ending 1300. 125

Figure D.17            Main Road Stoke – Weekday AM Peak Hour Ending 0900. 126

Figure D.18            Main Road Stoke – Weekday PM Peak Hour Ending 1700. 127

Figure D.19            Main Road Stoke– Weekday Midday Peak Hour Ending 1300. 128

Figure D.20            Waimea – Rocks Road - AM Peak Hour Ending 0900 - Screenline. 129

Figure D.21            Waimea – Rocks Road - PM Peak Hour Ending 1700 - Screenline. 130

Figure D.22            Waimea – Rocks Road - Midday Peak Hour Ending 1300 - Screenline. 131

Figure D.23            Waimea – Rocks Road – Weekday AM Peak Hour Ending 0900 - Screenline. 132

Figure D.24            Waimea – Rocks Road – Weekday PM Peak Hour Ending 1700 - Screenline. 133

Figure D.25            Waimea – Rocks Road – Weekday Midday Peak Hour Ending 1300 - Screenline. 134

Figure D.26            Pedestrian Counts 135

Figure D.27            Pedestrian – 7 hr Count Total 135

Figure D.28            2010 Comprehensive Cyclist and Pedestrian Count 136

Figure D.29            Cyclists – 24 hrs Estimates 137

Figure D.30            Cyclists – 24 hrs Estimates (All Routes Above) 137

Figure D.31            2010 Comprehensive Cyclist and Pedestrian Count 138

Figure D.33            Nelson - Projected population, 2015-2045. 139

Figure D.34:          Population projections by age groups, Nelson. 140

Figure F.1               Nelson-Tasman Transportation Model Link LoS Criteria. 146

Figure H.1               Annual Average Morning Peak Travel Times – Waimea Road. 149

Figure H.2               Annual Average Evening Peak Travel Times – Waimea Road. 149

Figure H.3               Annual Average Morning Peak Travel Times – Rocks Road. 150

Figure H.4               Annual Average Evening Peak Travel Times – Rocks Road. 150

 


Executive Summary

The transport activity

The Transport services and assets associated with this activity are primarily focussed on the safe, efficient and effective transport of people and goods around the Nelson region. This includes the provision, operation and maintenance of physical infrastructure on the road reserve such as for driving, parking, cycling and walking as well as the provision of safety, traffic control and public transport services.

The replacement cost of these assets is approximately $700 million, and the depreciated value is $570 million. This represents nearly 43% of Council assets.

This Asset Management Plan provides evidence based information on how transport activity in Nelson is performing, based on measurable levels of service and performance indicators. It is based on a sustainable whole of system approach that supports the type of City we want Nelson to be; safe, accessible and affordable to all.

National and local policy on transport

This Transport Asset Management Plan (TAMP) provides Council with the year to year financial guidance on the allocation of transport funds. It is a tactical, locally focussed document; developed around national and regional transport funding guidelines as indicated by the requirements of the New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA) and the Government Policy Statement (GPS) on Land Transport Funding. It will guide the transport spending for the years 2015-2018, as updated each year by the annual plan. The project programme in this TAMP will inform the transport spending in the Long Term Plan, both for the subsidised and unsubsidised sectors.

Previously this document has been developed within the broad guidelines set by the 2009 Regional Land Transport Strategy (RLTS) which supported a safe, efficient, integrated, sustainable land transport system. These guidelines have influenced the management of transport, specifically the subsidised policy, in Nelson over the last 6 years.

The Draft Government Policy Statement 2015 (GPS) on Land Transport Funding is issued by the Minister of Transport every three years. It has set out the below 3 government’s priorities for expenditure from the National Land Transport Fund over the next 10 years, broadly continuing the overall direction set by the Government Policy Statement in 2012 & 2009.

·      A strong and continuing focus on economic growth and productivity – The government’s investment in land transport should support increased economic growth and productivity in New Zealand.

·      Value-for-money – Land transport services should be delivered better and smarter. Asset management will be improved to boost performance of roading infrastructure. The Government Policy Statement 2015 makes it clear that getting more out of what is spent is expected.

·      Road safety – Road safety is a transport priority for the government. Safer Journeys, the Government’s road safety strategy, will be supported through the next National Land Transport Programme.

The Draft Regional Land Transport Plan 2015 – 2021 (RLTP) (due for public consultation in November 2014) sets out the subsidised transport prioritised programme for the six years in accordance with the NZ Transport Agency’s Investment and Revenue Strategy and in accordance with the GPS and this TAMP.

This approach in Nelson will continue to influence the management of private vehicle use by encouraging transport behavioural change, providing an integrated transport network that encourages all forms of transport, providing and improving modal choice and reducing the demand for travel.

The RLTP 2015 – 2021 has been adopted and confirms the direction detailed above.

The available means of achieving this are complex and inter-related. It is clear that no single measure in isolation will be successful in meeting the high level objectives and an integrated package of measures is required.

Key Issues

SUSTAINABILITY

Council has taken a “sustainable” approach to its transport network since the development of the 2009 Regional Land Transport Strategy. That strategy supported maintaining our existing transport infrastructure, increasing walking, cycling and passenger transport travel choices, and a targeted focus on growth areas. The direction started in the Regional Land Transport Strategy has been extended in this Asset Management Plan by rebalancing spending to projects of need, that increase mode choice and safety, rather than pursuing uneconomic low value for money projects. This direction is supported by the draft 2015 GPS objectives ‘providing appropriate transport choices’, ‘appropriately mitigates the effects of land transport on the environment’ and ‘addresses current and future demand’ by targeting growth areas. It also recognises the need for economic growth and the importance of efficient and effective freight transport to the Nelson region.

Arterial Traffic

The Arterial Traffic Study, in agreement with NZ Transport Agency in 2010 determined that:

·      There is not a significant traffic problem in Nelson, nor is one forecast to develop over the modelled time period of the study – the next 25 years.

Council’s resolution differed from the NZ Transport Agency approved study’s recommendations insofar as:

·      Council retain protection of the Southern Arterial Corridor only.

Ongoing traffic monitoring of the arterial routes shows that the traffic volumes are flat to declining in line with national and global observed trends. The decline is likely to be a result of many influences such as, technology developments reducing need to travel, an increase in walking, cycling and bus patronage, increases in car occupancy rates, reduction in teen drivers, ageing population travelling less and outside of peak times and increased cost of fuel.

Following the National Election in 2014 the Government announced that they would investigate the Southern Arterial Corridor using their Future Investment Fund.

Maintenance Operations and Renewals

Maintaining the transport infrastructure is key to ensuring we provide the desired level of service in the most cost effective manner. One of the key high cost components of the transport asset is the seal surface that waterproofs the pavement structure. Council currently has a backlog of surfaces that are overdue for resealing and treating this backlog is important to ensure that the life of our pavement structure is maximised.

Street lighting also has a backlog of aged fittings. Of greatest priority is the replacement of the inefficient and polluting mercury vapour lights on the network with LED fittings.

Condition assessments of the key transport assets are undertaken to ensure that they are maintained and renewed at the most cost effective time, however our knowledge of the remaining life of the assets and thus their depreciation needs improving in order better manage the maintenance and renewal future liability. This is a key component of the improvement plan.

PARKING

A parking study was undertaken in 2014 that informed the development of the draft ‘Parking Strategy 2014-2024’.

Survey data collected in 2005, 2008 and 2012 shows there is an appropriate supply of parking. Forecasting indicates there is unlikely to be any significant increase in demand over the next ten years.

The engagement undertaken has indicated that the Nelson public consider the key parking issues to broadly include enforcement, cost and payment options and all day CBD parking.

Subsequent to the draft parking strategy being prepared, Council, in response to the concerns of inner city retailers, resolved to remove the charge for parking for a winter trial period. As a result, finalisation of the strategy has been delayed until after this AMP has been completed. This AMP allows for the implementation of the actions detailed in the draft parking strategy but recognises that the direction and content of the parking strategy may change and some actions may not be necessary or other options may be trialled to ascertain their impact before the future direction is set.

Council resolved during the LTP deliberations to continue with the first hour of parking being free to users and then costing $1.50 per hour after that. The actions contained in the AMP appropriately reflect the intent of the draft strategy and no changes are necessary.

Nelson and Stoke CBD ENHANCEMENT

A number of projects identified in the Heart of Nelson – Central City Strategy have been completed to date. As part of the Long Term Plan 2015-25 (LTP) development Council will need to prioritise the remaining projects during 2015/16, determining which are still relevant, and considering if there are any new projects that should be added.  To inform this work data is being collected on the retail, employment and economic dynamics in the city. In conjunction with reporting back on the free parking trial period this will provide guidance on future projects within the Central City.

It is also clear residents feel Stoke CBD has been neglected over recent years and projects to revitalise the area, continue to provide for growth and facilities are overdue for funding. This TAMP includes Stoke CBD traffic and parking projects.

FREIGHT

Port Nelson as the maritime gateway to the region is extremely important to the economic development of Nelson and the wider region as it provides the ability for primary production to be exported. In the year ending June 2013 2.6M revenue tonnes were exported or imported via Port Nelson over the road network. With the greatest reliance on the primary industries of any region in the country it is critically important that the local road network is resilient and efficient for freight especially the routes to and from the port.

NZTA are predicting an increasing freight task of approximately 2% per annum with a key component of that a peak log harvest for the Nelson Marlborough Tasman area in the 2020 – 2025 period of double the current tonnage.

The 50 MAX vehicles have recently been introduced to allow more freight to be carried on fewer trucks on the local road network. 50 MAX High Productivity Motor Vehicles (HPMV) are trucks that are slightly longer than the standard 44 tonne vehicles. The modified design means that these trucks can carry more, but they perform on the road in the same way as a standard 44 tonne truck. The 50 MAX vehicles have an improved safety record and should not increase wear and tear on the road network. This TAMP proposes improvements to the bridges in the Maitai Valley to allow 50Max vehicles to access the adjacent forestry blocks.

FUNDING

The NZ Transport Agency, like Council, works on a three year funding cycle. The Transport Agency allocates funding to local authorities through the National Land Transport Plan which it adopts in July 2015, after considering each Regional Land Transport Plan (RLTP).

The Funding Assistance Rate (FAR) is the co-investment rate for transport activities that Council receives from the NZ Transport Agency In 2013 and 2014 the NZ Transport Agency reviewed the principals and methods used in setting the FAR. The NZTA have confirmed recently advised that there will be a single FAR for all activities and that Nelson’s FAR will increase. Nelson’s 14/15 current effective FAR for all activities was 46%. For the 2015/16 year the NZ Transport Agency has confirmed indicated that the FAR will be 47% and will rise by 1% per annum to 51% over five years.

This Asset Management Plan proposes a significant increase in expenditure for renewing the existing network.

There are several transport activities that Council already funds from rates without any co-investment. As investment rules tighten, Council always has the option of continuing with the activity or improving the level of service for an activity by increasing the activity’s funding from rates over the three year TAMP time frame.

The NZ Transport Agency introduced the One Network Road Classification (ONRC) at the end of 2013. It is proposed that this replaces Councils’ Road Hierarchy over time. This classification is to be implemented nationwide in order to provide more consistency in levels of service and the corresponding funding levels between regions. The effects of the ONRC on NZTA’s investment levels in Nelson City are uncertain at this stage.

During the development of the National Land Transport Programme the NZ Transport Agency did not fund the maintenance and operations budget to the level requested in the RLTP or this AMP.

The LTP retained a total of $325,000 in years two and three of the Long Term Plan so Council will be in a position to take up any additional funding should the NZ Transport Agency make it available for transportation renewals as originally proposed by the Regional Land Transport Plan and this TAMP.

 

Public satisfaction with the Transport activity

The 2014 Residents survey also showed that levels of satisfaction with the transport activity have remained relatively static over the last three years as can be seen in the figure below.

2014 Public Satisfaction With The Transport Activity

Residents who were dissatisfied with transport gave this rating because they felt public transport was limited (35%), or that cycleways need improvement (33%). Twenty nine per cent identified the roads need improvement.

A Balanced approach to transport strategy

The 2012 Transport Asset Management Plan adopted a “balanced approach” towards transport in Nelson and that approach has been continued through to this Plan.

Nationally and internationally, current transport planning has supported the encouragement of sustainable and alternative forms of transport for many years now, and Nelson has been at the forefront of actively supporting these forms of transport for over 15 years. Nelson has adopted a strategic momentum towards providing greater quality transport choices through the Asset Management Plans, the Regional Land Transport Strategy, Plan Changes and Council’s strategic sustainability policies. This has been effective in improving the walking and cycling networks in Nelson, and has supported the development of improved reliable public transport that offer viable options to residents. Nelson has developed a distinct travel choice culture.

This approach is fundamental to this TAMP and to the continued integrated delivery of projects by NCC over coming years. This will result in lower cost local road upgrades which are fit for purpose, provide opportunities for travel choices optimised whenever any project permits, and the travel needs of all road users recognised and catered for as feasible. In doing so Council:

·      Recognises the importance of well located, strong transport corridors that offer the potential for the efficient and safe flow of people and freight to assist the economic vitality of our region, and;

·      Acknowledges that more integrated approaches to traffic flow (the importance of slower speeds and placing a greater emphasis on walking, cycling and a sense of place) are necessary on our local roads and residential streets to promote social and community networks, supportive neighbourhoods, urban centres and safe streets.


Level of Service Summary Table

It must be recognised that Council has varying ability to influence some of these levels of service.

 

Level of Service

Performance Indicator

Current Performance

AMP Section Reference

Performance Target

MAINTENANCE

The Network, and its services in good condition and are “fit for purpose”

Smooth Travel Exposure*

87%

4.2.3, 4.2.4, 5.3

87% based on NZ Transport Agency standard roughness limits in ONRC

The Network, and its services in good condition and are “fit for purpose”

Average road roughness standard (National Association of Australian State Roading Authorities) by road classification.

Arterial/Principal, 69/90

Collector/Sub C, 97/117

4.3, 5.3

The following maximum average road roughness are not exceeded:

Arterial/Principal, 100

Collector/Sub C, 110

The Network, and its services in good condition and are “fit for purpose”

Average road roughness standard (National Association of Australian State Roading Authorities) by road classification.

Local, 106

Rural Sealed, 97

4.2.3, 4.2.4, 5.3

The following maximum average road roughness are not exceeded:

Local,120

Rural sealed, 120

The Network, and its services in good condition and are “fit for purpose”

The percentage of the local road (non State Highway) that is resurfaced annually*

4.8%

4.2.3, 4.2.4, 5.3

6.4% - 7.4%

The Network, and its services in good condition and are “fit for purpose”

The percentage of footpaths that meet or exceed the maximum acceptable roughness*

95%

4.2.1, 5.5

95% of the footpath network by length has a condition rating of ≤ 3

LOCAL ROADS, WALKING, CYCLING AND SCHOOLS

Walking and cycling are easy and attractive alternative transport choices.

Percentage of the community that travel to work by walking or cycling (based on Nelson City Council Annual Residents Survey and/or national census).

16% walked or cycled from the 2014 survey of residents. 2013 census data shows that 18.3% walked or cycled to work.

4.2.1, 4.8.1, 5.5, 5.6

25% of all journeys to work trips are by walking or cycling by 2018.

ARTERIAL TRAFFIC

An efficient transport system that enables people and freight to move efficiently.

Average AM and PM peak hour travel times on Waimea Road and the State Highway between Annesbrook and Haven Road roundabout

Rocks Road PM peak delay = 3min

Waimea Road AM peak delay = 2min

4.3, 4.8.2

Average peak hour travel time delays are no greater than 5 minutes above uncongested travel times.

ROAD SAFETY

Road Safety

Number of fatalities and serious injury crashes on the local road network*

The target of a maximum of 12 fatalities and serious injuries in 2013 was met with 12 recorded for that year.

4.4, 4.8.3, 5.9

The number of fatalities and serious injuries on local roads reduces by 4% per year from a base of 2007

Road safety

Number of injury crashes per kilometre of road.

2012 Calendar year rate is below maximum. Complete data for 2013 not available yet

4.4, 4.8.3, 5.9

The collective risk for each year reduces by at least 4% per year from a base of 2007

Road safety

Annual social cost of crashes (injury and non-injury) at intersections.

Target not met for 2012 after good performance in 2010 and 2011. The social cost of crashes was marginally above the target

4.4, 4.8.3, 5.9

The social cost for each year reduces by at least 4% per year from a base of 2007

Road safety

Number of crashes involving cyclists.

Target met for 2013. The number of cycle crashes (23) was the same as the target 2007 number.

4.4, 4.8.3, 5.9

Nelson City cycle crash numbers do not increase from those in the base year of 2007

Road safety

Number of crashes involving pedestrians

Target not met for 2013. The number of crashes involving pedestrians was 12, 100% more than the target number of 6.

4.4, 4.8.3, 5.9

Number of crashes involving pedestrians each year reduces by at least 4% per year from a 2007 base.

Road Safety

Total five year average social cost of urban crashes (injury and non-injury) at the worst 10 intersections

The social cost for 2013/14 worst 10 intersections was $4.2million compared with an average of $4.6million for the previous five years.

4.4, 4.8.3, 5.9

The annual total social cost is below the previous five year average.

PUBLIC TRANSPORT

Public transport services that meet the transport needs of the community with an equitable sharing of costs.

The farebox recovery ratio

Approximately 60% in 2012/13 and 62% in 2013/14

4.5, 4.8.4, 5.7

50%


 

Level of Service

Performance Indicator

Current Performance

AMP Section Reference

Performance Target

PARKING

The supply and pricing of short stay parking is managed to encourage commercial activity in the Central Business District.

Percentage of short stay parking spaces occupied in midweek peak in December

December 2012 - 81%

4.6, 4.8.5, 5.10

85%

The supply and pricing of long stay parking is managed to incentivise greater use of travel options other than cars.

Occupancy of long-stay parking spaces between peak travel times measured at 5 locations within the CBD fringe.

Not currently measured but will be in the future.

4.6, 4.8.5, 5.10

A reducing trend.

VALUE FOR MONEY PRINCIPLES

Public satisfaction.

Percentage of public satisfied and dissatisfied with the transport activity (based on Nelson City Council Annual Residents Survey).

Target not met

55% of respondents are either very satisfied or satisfied

17% of respondents are either dissatisfied or very dissatisfied

4.7, 4.8.6

More than 50% of respondents are either very satisfied or satisfied, and less than 10% are either dissatisfied or very dissatisfied.

Customer Responsiveness

Response to service requests*

95% in 2014

4.7, 4.8.6

80% of service requests responded to within 5 working days.

* Level of Service measure required by Local Government Act 2002.

 


Strategies, studies, reports and surveys

The following are planned for the next three years to enable and inform Council on future decisions. These are identified in the table below:

Study/strategy

AMP Section Reference

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

Parking surveys

2.81, 4.6, 4.12, 5.10 App J

$50,000

25,000

25,000

Traffic counting and monitoring

2.81, App J

$50,000

$50,000

$50,000

Stoke Foothills Traffic Needs Study

2.8.1, App J

 

$100,000

 

 

Atawhai Foothills Traffic Needs Study

2.8.1, App J

$100,000

 

 

CBD West Traffic Study

2.8.1, App J

 

$100,000

 

As a result of the LTP deliberations and staff fine tuning the methodology, the cost of parking surveys in 2016/17 and 2017/18 have been reduced to $10,000 per year as only a representative sample of car parks will be surveyed rather than the majority of the CBD. The Atawhai Hills study has been moved to 2016/17. The CBD West Study has been moved to 2017/18.

Major new operation and maintenance activities
(2015/16 to 2017/18)

·      $50,000 pa for the operation and maintenance of the Stock Effluent facility;

·      $100,000 pa for small scale emergency works, response and recovery;

·      An additional $200,000 pa for public transport. Options include a potential increase the arterial route frequency and extending the Stoke network coverage.

·      In response to NZTA changing their initial advice on the way emergency events would be funded, the emergency works budget has been reduced from $200,000 to $100,000 per year cumulating.

Major new RENEWAL AND CAPITAL activities (2015/16 to 2017/18)

·      Reseals budget of $1.33M/year due to the significant number of sites where the seal has reached the end of its useful life;

·      Increase the streetlight renewal budget to convert aged fittings to LED’s;

·      Earthquake strengthening of road bridges;

·      New footpaths budget to close missing links and provide footpaths on existing roads that have none;

·      Increase structural replacement programme for the road pavement;

·      Todd Bush Road upgrade in 2015/16;

·      CBD Nelson and Stoke Enhancement initiatives;

·      Give effect to the outcomes of the Draft Parking Strategy;

·      Road upgrades with walking and cycling network benefits in the Wigzell Park area;

·      Projects included in the Regional Land Transport Plan, including:

o    Implement walking, cycling and schools package (includes Rocks Rd, Tahunanui Network and the bridge across Saltwater creek on the Maitai Path);

o    Minor Improvements Budget of $650,000 pa.

 

Significant projects, (greater than $500,000) proposed for the following seven years

·      Implement the outcomes of the Stoke and Atawhai Foothills studies;

·      Complete the street upgrades in The Wood area;

·      CBD Nelson and Stoke Enhancement initiatives;

·      Give effect to the outcomes of Draft Parking Strategy;

·      Marsden Valley Road / The Ridgeway intersection upgrade – subject to investigation;

·      Marsden Road / Main Road Stoke intersection upgrade – subject to investigation;

·      Marsden Valley Road Upgrade

·      Rocks Road Plant and Food to Maitai Path - Walk Cycle link

DEFERRED CAPITAL ACTIVITIES

Council, in the 2012 AMP, refocused its capital expenditure priorities away from upgrading local low traffic, low pedestrian and cycle volume roads that require a high cost to upgrade (e.g. hillside road upgrades). It targeted investment to maintaining the existing road infrastructure and contributing its local share to the regionally funded projects identified in the Regional Land Transport Plan. The remaining unsubsidised capital was prioritised on projects with significant traffic volumes and / or safety issues.

Several less urgent road upgrades identified in previous LTP's have been either deferred or removed.

This AMP proposes to fund street and intersection upgrades that provide walking and cycling network improvements such as the Wigzell Park area north of the Hospital.

The Wigzell area improvements have been replaced with a general “shared zone” project to the value of $100,000 per year under the Work Category 341: Minor Improvements.

Key ASSET MANAGEMENT ISSUES

·      Outcomes from the One Network Road Classification (ONRC) framework that will drive national level of service consistency through the NZ Transport Agency funding mechanisms;

·      Outcomes from the Central region freight analysis/study;

·      Outcomes from the NBus review which include funding and service levels;

·      Deterioration of footpath surfacing due to increased costs to meet desired level of service, resulting in less renewal length being achieved;

·      Outcomes from the Parking Strategy 2014;

·      The updating of key transport policy documents;

o    Structures on Road Reserve;

o    Licence to occupy Road Reserve;

o    Road Occupation Policy.

 

Key assumptions and uncertainties

As well as the general assumptions that apply across Council’s work, assumptions specific to transport include:

·      The National and Regional funding identified in the Draft Regional Land Transport Plan will be supported in the National Land Transport Programme.

·      The NZ Transport Agency financial assistance rates will increase from the current 46% to 47% in 2015/16 and rise by 1% per annum to 51% over five years.

·      The NZ Transport Agency will co-fund the regions passenger transport at an increased level from 2012-15 RLTP.

·      Tasman District Council will contribute $80,000 per year to the Nelson / Richmond passenger transport service which has been confirmed in their LTP.

·      Public transport patronage will be at a level that continues to support the public transport level of service.

·      Energy prices will not increase/decrease significantly over the next three years with a consequent effect on vehicle use or shifts to other modes of transport.

·      The number of vehicles and vehicle movements per household will continue at no greater than 2013 levels over the period covered by this Asset Management Plan.

·      Parking meter revenue is collected at a level of $460,000 pa.

·      That paid parking in the CBD is applied other than during the winter months.

·      Tasman District Council will continue to promote free parking within Richmond.

·      Free parking for the first hour and an increase thereafter to the rate of $1.50 per hour continues over the period covered by this Asset Management Plan.

·     

 


1.       Introduction

1.1.     Purpose

Council manages activities and assets on behalf of the ratepayers of Nelson to a value in excess of $1 billion. The assets are part of the city’s physical infrastructure and are important because many public services rely upon them and because they represent a significant investment by the community, built up over the last 100 years and more. The activities are equally important, and represent the way in which services are delivered to ratepayers.

The Local Government Act 2002 and the Land Transport Management Act 2003 places a legal obligation on Council to manage its assets to provide a specified standard of service in a cost effective manner. Council has committed to undertake this obligation in accordance with the Asset/Activity Management Policy using Asset and Activity Management Plans.

1.2.     Plan Structure

The Plan is divided into two parts. Part 1 has four sections:

·      Introduction;

·      What are the future demand issues to consider?;

·      What’s the direction?;

·      The delivery of a balanced approach.

Optimised delivery requires consideration of the transport network to enable the financial forecasts to be developed. The second part contains a more detailed analysis of the transport assets and activities, set out as follows:

·      Asset Management Systems;

·      Valuation;

·      Financial Forecasts and Development Contributions;

·      Risk Management;

·      Performance Monitoring and Improvement Plan.

1.3.     The Transport Activity

The Transport services and assets associated with this activity are primarily focussed on the safe, efficient and effective transport of people and goods around the region. This includes the provision of physical infrastructure on the road reserve such as for driving, parking, cycling and walking as well as the provision of safety, traffic control and public transport services.

The transport assets owned by Council include:

·      The vehicle network (road pavements, bridges, retaining walls);

·      The cycle network (cycle lanes, shared paths, cycle paths);

·      The pedestrian network (footpaths, walkways, bridges);

·      Infrastructure on road reserve (kerbs and channels, sumps, storm water control, street furniture;

·      Network control and management (traffic lights, signs, line markings);

·      Safety (streetlights, fences, guardrails);

·      Parking (on and off street car parks, parking meters and parking enforcement);

·      Passenger Transport (bus services/stops, total mobility services);

·      The replacement cost of these assets is approximately $700 million, and the depreciated value is $570 million.

1.4.     The Stakeholders

Council does not consult on its Asset Management Plans but does consult via the LTP, Regional Land Transport Plan and individually on transport planning and engineering projects and activities depending on the significance and location. Below is a list of key stakeholders, key user groups and area specific user groups that may be consulted to enable the implementation of this Plan.

1.4.1.   Key Stakeholders

Key stakeholders identified in this plan are:

·      The community of Nelson, including Tangata Whenua comprising six Iwi;

·      New Zealand taxpayers who fund the co-investment provided by the NZ Transport Agency;

·      Other asset and activity user such as visitors and tourists;

·      The Ministry of Transport and the NZ Transport Agency;

·      Tasman and Marlborough District Councils;

·      New Zealand Police, fire and ambulance services;

·      The Nelson Marlborough District Health Board;

·      The Accident Compensation Corporation.

·      The installers of ultra-fast broadband cables, power and telecom lines.

·      Other key users groups that may be identified on a project by project basis.

1.4.2.   Te Tau Ihu Treaty Settlement Act 2014

The Te Tau Ihu Treaty of Waitangi Settlement Acts 2014 (the Acts) for the eight iwi of Te Tau Ihu:

·      Ngati Kuia,

·      Rangitane o Wairau,

·      Ngati Toa Rangatira,

·      Ngati Koata,

·      Ngati Rarua,

·      Ngati Tama ki Te Tau Ihu,

·      Te Atiawa o Te Waka a – Maui,

·      Ngati Apa ki te Ra To

provide statutory obligations for Council in respect to general decision making processes, and specifically in RMA process and decision making. The Acts passed into legislation on the 1st of August 2014. Each Act provides each of the eight iwi with redress for past grievances dating back to 1840 in the Top of the South with an apology from the Crown. There are three types of redress provided for in the settlements as identified in Table 1.1 below. The redress that is shaded indicates that which are relevant to Asset Management Plans and the LTP. Council will be working with the eight iwi of Te Tau Ihu on relationships establishment and implementation of the settlements in relation to Councils governance and decision making processes through the 2014/15 year. For asset management planning undertaken in 2014 Council has held a workshop with iwi beginning a process of partnership and establishment of good working relationships for managing areas of significance such as the coastal marine area, freshwater bodies and catchments, reserves management and heritage.

The Ngāti Kōata, Ngāti Rārua, Ngāti Tama ki Te Tau Ihu, and Te Ātiawa o Te Waka-a-Māui Claims Settlement Act 2014, Ngāti Apa ki te Rā Tō, Ngāti Kuia, and Rangitāne o Wairau Claims Settlement Act 2014 and the Ngati Toa Rangatira Claims Settlement Act 2014 (The Acts) provides statutory obligations for Council in respect to general decision making processes. The Acts are the culmination of Central Government’s resolution of claims lodged by the eight iwi for redress of past wrong’s and provides for Cultural, Relationship and Financial redress.

Statutory acknowledgments may impact works programmes within the Asset Management Plan and the eight iwi will potentially be considered as affected parties under section 95E of the Resource Management Act, which the settlement legislation provides for.

Table 1.1       Te Tau Ihu Settlement Bill Proposed Redress

Note: Items relevant to asset management planning are shaded.

 

 

 

Cultural Redress

Statutory kaitiaki over a number of Department of Conservation administered Crown lands and the Coastal Marine Area

Vesting of sites in iwi ownership

Overlay classifications which require the Crown to acknowledge iwi values in that area

Statutory acknowledgments and deeds of recognition which are recognised under the RMA 1991 and Historic Places Act 1993

Statements of association, place names changes, crown payment, pouwhenua and mineral fossicking rights

 

 

 

Relationship Redress

Promotion of the relationship between iwi and local authorities of Te Tau Ihu

Protocols which encourage good working relationships on matters of cultural importance to iwi

Letters of introduction to museums and film archives

River and freshwater advisory committee to be set up and provide input into local authority decision making in relation to the management of rivers and freshwater under the RMA 1991

Memorandum of Understanding between iwi and the Department of Conservation

 

Financial Redress

Financial settlement

Commercial redress which involves properties being purchased by iwi and then leased back to the Crown, and first right of refusal over a number of properties

1.5.     The End Users

The end users of this plan are the Council staff in the transport asset management and operations departments. They will use this plan to manage the city’s assets and activities on the road reserve in a cost effective, sustainable, well planned and coordinated manner to provide agreed levels of service.

This document is also part of the business case to support the RLTP for the local road component and assists in informing the LTP.

1.6.     The Legislative Context

The overall legislative framework for planning, funding and managing the land transport system includes Acts, Regulations and Rules, a list of these fundamental to transport are provided in Appendix A.

1.7.     Strategic Context

1.7.1.   Government Outcomes

Forward Plan for Transport

The government’s policy direction for transport over the next decade is outlined in “Connecting New Zealand”, published August 2011. This publication is still very relevant as government policy has not changed significantly since 2011 but it does still refer to the previous Government Policy Statement. The publication identifies the big issues for transport systems as being:

·      Population growth;

·      Ageing population;

·      Global freight growth;

·      Fuel prices and volatility;

·      Transport emissions;

·      Transport security; and

·      New technology.

The publication clearly identifies that central government is responsible for responding to issues that are beyond its direct control, such as oil prices, ageing population and the effects of climate change, and that local government is responsible for regional and local transport planning and delivery.

A fundamental policy evident from the publication is that the government wants the costs associated with transport choices to be as clear as possible, and for the price of using each mode to match actual cost as much as possible. This will enable businesses and individuals to make the transport decisions that best meet their needs.

The publication provides a reality statement in regard to travel demand management initiatives and their effectiveness in relieving congestion. It states “We need to make sure that the arteries of our cities do not become clogged and that access to our key rail hubs, air and sea ports remain free moving, and that the corridors along our key supply chains also remain protected from congestion. In some cases, the government is taking a lead infrastructure approach to land transport investments, leading improvements in capacity ahead of them being required to encourage economic growth. In doing so, the government is being careful to respond to predicted incremental changes in transport demand and trends, rather than seeking wholesale mode shift for non-economic reasons. The latter would lead to a deadweight economic loss by encouraging inefficient transport choices.”

The publication also reiterates the governments focus on delivering value for money, it states “Improving performance and productivity right across the public service is a high priority for the government, including the transport sector. The government needs to be confident that the transport sector (central and local government in particular) is delivering the right infrastructure and services to the right level and for the best possible price.”

Government Policy Statement 2015/16 to 2024/25

The Government Policy Statement on Land Transport Funding is issued by the Minister of Transport every three years. It sets out the government’s priorities for expenditure from the National Land Transport Fund over the next 10 years.

The Government Policy Statement influences decisions on how money from the National Land Transport Fund will be invested in activity classes, such as state highways and public transport. It also guides the NZ Transport Agency and local government on the type of activities that should be included in regional land transport plans and the National Land Transport Programme. Regional Land Transport strategies must take account of the Government Policy Statement and Regional Land Transport plans must be consistent with the Government Policy Statement.

The Draft Government Policy Statement 2015 broadly continues the overall direction set by the Government Policy Statement in 2012 & 2009 and contains three priorities:

·      A strong and continuing focus on economic growth and productivity – The government’s investment in land transport should support increased economic growth and productivity in New Zealand.

·      Value-for-money – Land transport services should be delivered better and smarter. Asset management will be improved to boost performance of roading infrastructure. The Government Policy Statement 2015 makes it clear that getting more out of what is spent is expected.

·      Road safety – Road safety is a transport priority for the government. Safer Journeys, the Government’s road safety strategy, will be supported through the next National Land Transport Programme.

·     

1.7.2.   NZ Transport Agency Outcomes

The NZ Transport Agency has identified the impacts it wishes to deliver through the implementation of its investment and revenue strategy. These are:

·      better use of existing transport capacity;

·      more efficient freight supply chains;

·      a resilient and secure network;

·      easing of severe urban congestion;

·      more efficient vehicles;

·      reductions in deaths and serious injuries;

·      more transport mode choice; and

·      reduction in adverse environmental effects from land transport.

1.7.3.   Council’s Strategies, Plans and Policies

Nelson City has a well-developed set of strategies and policies relating to the city’s environment, its land use and transport systems, and its community. A summary of these is provided in Appendix B. The present suite of relevant documents has been developed over the past two decades, in line with statutory and associated requirements. Some of the separate strategies are not binding in a statutory sense, but help to elucidate the Council’s intended directions or approaches.

The strategies and policies have been developed with significant community input, and can be said to reflect the directions which the community wishes to follow to achieve the City we want Nelson to be.

Council-supplied transport infrastructure and transport planning contributes to achieving the following Council Community Outcomes:


 

Table 1.2       Council Community Outcomes

Outcomes/Goals

How transport contributes to achieving the outcome goals

Our unique natural environment is healthy and protected.

Through providing a range of transport modes that minimise the impact on the environment.

Our urban and rural environments are people-friendly, well planned and sustainably managed

Through taking into account the impact on public spaces when providing transport infrastructure.

Our infrastructure is efficient, cost effective and meets current and future needs

Optimisation of both maintenance and renewal expenditure is undertaken to ensure the least cost for the whole of the assets life.

Through providing an effective and efficient transport system that meets the needs of residents and businesses.

Our communities are healthy, safe, inclusive and resilient

Through providing a safe and resilient transport network that provides for all modes.

Our communities have opportunities to celebrate and explore their heritage, identity and creativity

The transport asset provides the space and means to allow our community to interact.

Our communities have access to a range of social, educational and recreational facilities and activities.

The transport asset provides the space and means to allow our community to interact.

Our Council provides leadership and fosters partnerships, a regional perspective, and community engagement

Through providing a transport network that takes account of our regional placement.  Through engaging with our community as the transport network is developed.

Our region is supported by an innovative and sustainable economy

Through providing an effective and efficient transport system that meets the needs of residents and businesses.

1.7.4.   Linkage Diagram to Planning Documents

Figure 1.1     Relationship between Statutes and Policy Documents

 


2.       WHAT ARE THE FUTURE DEMAND ISSUES TO CONSIDER?

There are several demand drivers that need to be taken into account when considering the future delivery of transport assets and activities. The development of a number of strategic documents, studies and models has enabled access to a vast amount of knowledge on several of the key demand drivers in Nelson and it is not intended to repeat the data contained within those documents in this plan. The demand drivers, document names, source reference and relevant notes are provided in Appendix C. Within these documents data on population, traffic, heavy commercial vehicles, port cargo, airport use, walking, cycling, passenger transport, travel demand management, fuel price rises, sea level rise and funding are provided.

The Arterial Traffic Study, which is the most comprehensive transport study undertaken in Nelson in recent years, provides a definitive assessment of the demand issues for the region and a comprehensive analysis for each mode, given expected population growth and the region’s demographics.

An overview of the documents in Appendix C indicates the following key trends, although it needs to be emphasised that future environmental, economic and social shocks have the potential to significantly alter these trends:

Population

Nelsons population is expected to grow as shown in Figure 2.1 below. This information is based on population projections by Statistics New Zealand published on 19 February 2015, using Census 2013 demographics and trends as a base (2013-based). The medium growth series has been used as Statistics New Zealand advised at the time that the medium projection is considered suitable for assessing future population change.

Nelson’s population is expected to grow by 5,000 3,600 over the next ten years, to almost 55,000 53,320 residents in 2025. Continuing the present trend, over half of the growth will be driven by increasing population in Stoke, and the populations in Nelson Central, Nelson North and Tahunanui are also expected to increase. about a quarter is from Nelson Central.

·      An ageing population with an increasing median age and an increasing proportion of older people

·      The proportion of the population aged under 15 years will decrease after 2018, from 18% to 16% in 2025 and to 15% by 2045. The number of children is likely to keep increasing until around 2025

·      Smaller households with an increase in one-person households

Population growth is expected to slow down after 2025, resulting in an increase of 4,700 residents over the 20 years between 2025 and 2045, to almost 60,000 in 2045. Most of the growth in these later years is again driven by an increasing population in Stoke but the rest of Nelson (Nelson North, Nelson Central and Tahuna) are also projected to have increasing populations.

Congestion

The Arterial Traffic Study determined that overall there is likely to be a 26-28% increase in peak hour trips in the next 30 years, a reduction in average trip length and an increase in interpeak and off-peak directions along the current arterial routes and little or no increase in peak direction traffic.

Traffic count data collected since late 2009 provides detail as to the distribution of trips throughout the day and by direction on the key arterial routes. This data shows that in general, traffic volumes on Rocks Road and Waimea Road in the busiest direction (northbound in the AM peak and southbound in the PM peak) have remained flat or slightly decreasing. In the opposing direction traffic volumes during these times traffic volumes have increased. During the midday peak the traffic volumes travelling into Nelson have remained static and reduced in the Richmond direction.

The data collected for Main Road Stoke is at a location south of Saxton Road. That data shows the traffic volume on this arterial route is generally trending downwards in the southbound direction and is static to slightly decreasing in the northbound direction.

Refer to Appendix D for traffic flow data on the main arterials.

Car trips

·      Overall car trips per capita have remained flat or decreased over the last three years. This has resulted in a corresponding reduction in arterial traffic volumes, refer Appendix D for traffic flow data on the main arterials.

Freight

The National Freight Demand Study 2014 predicts growth in freight movements from 18.6 million tonnes in 2012 to 28.04 million tonnes in 2042 for the Nelson/Marlborough/Tasman region. This corresponds to an average annual growth rate of around 2%. That Freight Demand Study also highlighted a peak log harvest for the Nelson Marlborough Tasman area in the 2020 – 2025 period of double the current tonnage.

Passenger Transport

·      Modelling undertaken for the arterial traffic study indicates low patronage uptake unless there is a significant increase in vehicle use costs (i.e. fuel prices and/or parking charges). There has been strong growth in demand for public transport over the last three years but this is expected to plateau in the medium term without further increases in the route frequency or coverage.

Walking

·      The results of the 2014 Residents Survey show that around 8% of residents walk to work. This percentage has dropped over the last four years from 10%, refer Appendix D for historic pedestrian counts.

Cycling

·      Records show an 8-9% growth per year over the last three years, although it is uncertain whether this growth can be sustained. Refer Appendix D for historic pedestrian counts.

Demographic Change

·      Census data indicates that generally the region’s population is ageing, over half of Nelsons population growth was in Stoke and the local demographic profile includes a “gap” in the 15 to 40 year cohorts (such trends are found nationwide with the gap being typical of provincial cities). This is likely to contribute to more off-peak journeys and slightly reduced traffic growth over time, due to the travel patterns of the growing number of older people and an increasing demand for services for the over 65 years age group, i.e. improved total mobility services and footpaths and shared paths designed for the sight impaired and those who use mobility scooters.

·     


Figure 2.1     Projected Population and Households Growth

Forecasting Assumptions

The Council produces a LTP every three years to set the strategic direction for the city over the following ten years. It enables integrated decision-making, land use planning, infrastructure and facilities development, environmental protection. It outlines how Council will provide services as the population increases and summarises Council’s financial allocation and prioritisation process.

Forecasting assumptions are crucial to gaining the right direction and use of public funds. Forecasting for growth considers three key components being population growth, growth in property and growth in economic activity. For transport the Council records the relevant assumptions within the transport activity in the LTP.

2.1.     Arterial Traffic

The development of the city’s State Highway and arterial network has been a fraught process over recent years. A 1967 study originally mooted a highway between Nelson city and Richmond to relieve forecast traffic growth along Main Road Stoke, Annesbrook, Tahunanui, Rocks Road and Waimea Road, bypassing Stoke on the seaward side and heading over the Bishopdale hill down the railway reserve where the railway lines were lifted in 1955.

In 2001 the first half of this highway, bypassing Stoke, was completed by Transit New Zealand and named Whakatu Drive. The second part, known most notably as the Southern Link, was rejected by the Environment Court in 2004 and led to the commissioning of the joint NZ Transport Agency, Nelson City Council and Tasman District Council study of the wider Nelson – Richmond transport issues, known as the North Nelson to Brightwater Strategic Study in 2008.

This culminated in a long term vision to 2026, including a combination of public transport, cycling, traffic management and travel demand management measures to support road improvements. No final decision was made on this strategy; consequently in 2009 the Nelson Regional Transport Committee completed the draft Regional Land Transport Strategy which acknowledged a need for additional road capacity as well as a significant improvement in public transport services in the region. The railway reserve was acknowledged as a logical potential transport corridor if ever required.

In 2009 - 2010 NCC undertook the Arterial Traffic Study to determine the best transport option between Annesbrook and QE11/Haven Rd roundabouts that would improve the City as a whole.

The Arterial Traffic Study was a significant piece of work completed in 2011 to enable a better understanding of short to medium term demand issues as they relate directly to Nelson. The outcome has a fundamental bearing on how network growth is addressed in the region. Essentially the Arterial Traffic Study, in agreement with the NZ Transport Agency, determined that:

·      There is not a significant traffic problem in Nelson, nor is one forecast to develop over the modelled time period of the study – the next 25 years.

·      Of the four options that were assessed in the study Option A - Peak Hour Clearways and Option B – Southern Arterial both offered positives but also had negatives.

·      Elements of Option A can be done in stages to provide additional capacity when needed, for example – the study recommended progressing the walk/cycleway around the waterfront in the short term.

·      Option B – the Southern Arterial route should be protected as a long-term future dedicated transport corridor should things change.

The Council considered the Arterial Traffic Study and preferred the Southern Arterial Corridor as the best long term transport option route. NCC officers were directed to prepare an issues definition report assessing the options available for protecting the Southern Arterial Corridor. The Corridor Management Plan was completed in late 2013.

Following the National Election in 2014 the Government announced that they would investigate the Southern Arterial Corridor using their Future Investment Fund.

2.2.     Accessibility

Accessibility can be viewed as the "ability to access" and often focuses on people with disabilities or special needs and their right of access, although it is universal and impacts on us all whether we are young, old, rural, urban, able-bodied or have a disability.

The needs of all sectors of the community should be considered when designers maintain and build Council’s infrastructure.

Typical issues that have been raised by the accessibility sector for which demand for action by Council is growing include:

·      Quality of some footpaths and crossing points which cause barriers for pushchairs, mobility scooters and wheelchairs;

·      Lack of appropriately located parking spaces for mobility impaired

·      Lack of footpaths on some roads;

·      Poor pedestrian crossing facilities on the following main transport corridors - Rocks Road, Annesbrook Drive, Waimea Road, Nayland Road;

·      Council has recently formally joined the regional A4A (Accessibility for All) forum where regional accessibility issues can be raised and improvements considered. Council has also recently made a significant improvement in the routes and frequency of public transport which will improve accessibility for many Nelson residents.

2.3.     Sustainability

2.3.1.   Overview of Sustainability

The Local Government Act 2002 sets out principles that local authorities must act in accordance with. The legislation requires local authorities to ensure prudent stewardship and the efficient and effective use of its resources in the interests of its district or region; and in taking a sustainable development approach, take into account:

·      The social, economic, and cultural interests of people and communities; and

·      The need to maintain and enhance the quality of the environment; and

·      The reasonably foreseeable needs of future generations

In 2011 Council began work on a 50 year vision of what Nelson could become, using sustainability principles. The vision statement was adopted in the LTP 2012-22 and the full Strategy in 2013. It identified ten goals that the Nelson community said were priorities for action and Council is now working to ensure that these goals and sustainability principles are integrated into all the decisions made about its activities.

Sustainable development actions and approaches are embedded throughout this asset management plan. These include the following:

Goal 3

Our natural environment – air, land, rivers and sea – is protected and healthy

·      The Balanced Approach to managing the transport assets moves the emphasis away from purely providing increasing road capacity. The emphasis is instead on providing for an appropriate mix of transport modes while maximising the efficient operation of the road assets we already have. The continued funding and resulting growth in NBus use contributes to a reduction in vehicle emissions, especially in the slower moving air sheds around Stoke, Victory, Hospital and Bishopdale areas.

·      The focus on providing improved safety for pedestrians and cyclists has the effect of encouraging use of these transport modes further and in turn also contributing to a reduction in vehicle emissions.

Goal 5

We are able to rapidly adapt to change

·      Programmed for year two of this AMP, the Atawhai Hills transport study is at least partially focussed on increasing the resilience of the road network between the northern suburbs and the Nelson CBD.

·      Constant monitoring of the traffic conditions and the split of mode choice will enable us to monitor trends in key performance indicators and allow us to respond early to any emerging issues. As detailed in the Improvement Plan improvements to how this data is collected and analysed are planned in the next three years.

Goal 6

We move from using fossil fuels to renewable energy sources

·      As with Goal three, the investment in the alternative transport modes of cycling, walking and public transport encourages their use. In turn any growth in use of these modes reduces use of fossil fuels.

Goal 9

Everyone in our community has their essential needs met

·      There are three main groups within the Nelson community that are transport disadvantaged; the youth, elderly and those at the lower end of the socio-economic spectrum. The ongoing provision of the NBus is targeted at meeting this essential need for this group of the community.

Councils approach to its transport network has taken a “sustainable” approach since the development of the 2009 Regional Land Transport Strategy. That strategy supported increasing walking, cycling and passenger transport travel choices, and placed a reduced emphasis on providing for future traffic growth. The direction started in the Regional Land Transport Strategy has been continued in this Asset Management Plan by rebalancing spending to projects of need, which maintains the existing transport infrastructure and increase mode choice and safety, rather than pursuing uneconomic low value for money projects. It has also included whole of life assessment of the transport assets and the development of long term management strategies to protect the life of the asset to maximise value for money and investment.

2.4.     Environmental Risks

Environmental risks include earthquakes, heavy rainfall, slips and storm surges. Council does not specifically fund large scale environmental risks for roading but has acknowledged that it will be required to increase loan funding to pay for 30 to 50 percent half of the cost to repair the roading infrastructure should a large scale event occur. The NZ Transport Agency funds the balance other half through the National Land Transport Fund.

An assessment of the roading bridges has been undertaken and those on lifeline routes up the Maitai and Brook valleys are prioritised for seismic strengthening subject to NZ Transport Agency funding approval to secure access to the city water supply infrastructure.

2.5.     Regional Considerations

There are several differences in the way Nelson manages its Transport Network compared to Tasman. It is important to recognise those differences to enable an understanding of the extent to which they affect the Nelson network and community.

Nelson views the provision of improved passenger transport services as essential in providing greater mode choice but also as a means of reducing peak hour congestion between Nelson and Richmond. The cooperation and support of passenger transport by Richmond‘s residents and governing bodies is important if Nelson is to achieve efficient and resilient connectivity with its nearest regional centre. Recently the two councils have been working together to achieve this. Tasman District Council have included a $80,000 pa allowance in their LTP and 2015-2025 Asset Management Plan to assist in funding the bus service.

There are differences between Nelson and Richmond parking policies which implies a more fundamental philosophical difference in transport policy between the two regions. The funding of passenger transport and the charging and restricting of parking are essential tools in managing the transport network to influence mode choice.

Another regional consideration is the allocation of Nelson’s “R” funding. Currently the NZ Transport Agency has confirmed that it is to be spent within the “region”, and will be spent on the highest ranking projects in terms of NZ Transport Agency’s investment and revenue strategy. This effectively means that Nelson projects are competing for priority with NZ Transport Agency’s state highway projects.

There are likely to be differences in the way Nelson manages its transport assets compared to Tasman as, being a city, it has to deal with different issues. This is probably reflected most in the Land Development Manual, footpath resealing policy, capital works prioritisation method, cycling and walking policies, Regional Passenger Transport Plan, Regional Land Transport Plan, minor safety polices, street lighting, and growth management strategies.

2.6.     Funding

Financial Assistance Rates are used to determine what portion of a project or programme could be funded from the National Land Transport Fund, which is administered by the NZ Transport Agency through the National Land Transport Programme.

In 2013 and 2014 the NZ Transport Agency reviewed the principals and methods used in setting the FAR. Recently the NZ Transport Agency advised there will be one rate for all activities and that Nelson’s FAR will increase. Nelson’s current effective FAR for all activities was 46%. For the 2015/16 year the NZ Transport Agency has confirmed indicated that the FAR will be 47% and will rise by 1% per annum to 51% over five years. The table below details the FAR that Nelson will receive for each year from 2015/16:

Table 2.1       NZ Transport Agency Financial Assistance Rates

Financial Year

Financial Assistance Rate

2014/15

46%

2015/16

47%

2016/17

48%

2017/18

49%

2018/19

50%

2019/20

51%

Council have a risk sharing arrangement with the NZ Transport Agency whereby elevated funding assistance rate for emergency works of subsidised assets. Recent preliminary advice indicates that The subsidy would available only for out of ordinary short duration natural events that have a recovery and reinstatement cost greater than $100,000 .

NZ Transport Agency have yet to announce the FAR for emergency works. Their preliminary advice is that it may be 10% above the standard FAR.

The funding assistance rate that applies to emergency works within each financial year is:

·      For cumulative claims the total costs of emergency works up to 10% of the total cost of the subsidised maintenance programme for the year, the normal FAR

·      for the part of cumulative claims of total costs of emergency works that exceeds 10% of the approved maintenance programme for the year, the normal FAR. plus 20%.

 

In 2012 The NZ Transport Agency advised that due to national financial constraints the ‘R’ funding can be spent up to 2018 rather than 2015.

There are several other sources of funding to support the Transport network along with NZ Transport Agency co-investment and rates. These are Development Contributions, private / public partnerships, utilisation and expansion of parking revenue (which has been contributing towards cost of democracy for last 20 years).

Council’s Development Contributions Policy does not permit contributions from growth on roads classified as local although many of Council’s projects are designed to cater for future growth, through providing walking and cycling infrastructure on local roads. Previous roading policy determined that 20% of network usage was attributable to growth when a new road is built or upgraded. It is suggested that this proportion of growth could be applied to all new roads and roading improvements, not excluding local roads as these are more likely to service growth areas. It is also proposed that development contributions should also be taken, at the same proportions for walking, cycling and passenger transport infrastructure. These proposals are now being considered in the Development Contributions Policy review.

Council’s new Development Contributions Policy, adopted as part of the LTP process, has included projects on all road classifications.

2.7.     Funding Risk

There are already several transport activities that Council funds from rates without any co-investment. As investment rules tighten, Council always has the option of continuing with the activity or improving the level of service for an activity by increasing the activities funding from rates. If Council chooses to increase rates funding then The NZ Transport Agency will view the activity as affordable by Council and will be unlikely to ever fund that activity to a greater extent again.

The NZ Transport Agency, like Council, works on a three year funding cycle. The NZ Transport Agency allocates funding through the National Land Transport Programme which it adopts in July 2015, after considering each regional land transport plan. There is a risk that activities which may be eligible for funding, and budgeted to receive funding in the LTP, are declined funding after the Council has adopted its LTP. This will mean that some activities will have to be reconsidered by Council to decide if additional funding is provided, or the projects are postponed.

This risk has been a key component on some local projects in recent years where there has been uncertainty over a project receiving co-investment due to delays in approvals, leading to confusion, especially when community engagement is required early on in the design of a project.

2.8.     Transport Network Resilience

The Regional Land Transport Plan aims to maximise the efficiency of the transport system with minimal expenditure through encouraging the community to shift to more sustainable ways of moving around the City. This concept is developed further in the next section, resulting in a proposed balanced approach (Section 3.5) to managing the transport network.

Other aspects of a communities resilience relies on Council’s other strategic documents such as sustainability strategy, social wellbeing policy and, of critical importance, it’s long term growth strategy implemented through the resource management plan.

2.8.1.   Planning for Growth

Growth is planned for in a number of ways. The most formalised process is through Resource Management Plan Changes.

Investigation has been recently completed on a number of transport issues that are related to future growth, these are:

·      Nelson City Council / NZ Transport Agency / Tasman District Council 3 roundabouts project;

·      Parking Strategy;

·      Southern Transport Corridor - Issues Definition Report;

·      Rocks Road walk and cycle investigation;

·      Waimea Road Enhancement Study and intersection improvements;

·      Tahunanui Cycle Network.

Investigation is planned for the following:

·      Stoke Foothills Transportation Study – investigation into intersection and surrounding network to accommodate growth in the Stoke foothills;

·      Atawhai Hills Transportation Study - investigation into intersection and surrounding network to accommodate growth in the hills to the north of the City;

·      Annesbrook / Parkers and Quarantine Road modelling [Discuss status with NZ Transport Agency]

·      CBD West intersection modelling update - scheduled for Year 3.

2.8.2.   Building for Growth

Council is concentrating on providing services to areas that are zoned for development (Residential, Rural Zone High Density Small Holdings, Suburban Commercial and Industrial) but are covered by the Services Overlay because one or more servicing constraints have been identified as needing to be addressed prior to the development of that property / area. The projects to facilitate future growth identified in this AMP therefore only consist of works required to eliminate servicing constraints on sites zoned for development and these have been prioritised in accordance with Council’s strategic planning process.

The projects identified in the Asset Management Plan which have a substantial growth component (>50%) are identified below, along with the years they are programmed:

·      2023/24, Marsden Valley Road / The Ridgeway intersection – subject to investigation;

·      2023/24, Marsden Road / Main Road Stoke intersection – subject to investigation;

·      2022/25, Marsden Valley Road Upgrade;

·      2015/16, Todd Bush Road;

·      2021/22, Lucas Terrace Upgrade.

 

Council resolved during the LTP and Development Contributions Policy deliberations to bring a minor improvement for Marsden Valley Road / The Ridgeway forward to 2015/16. This does not have any budget implications as the rest of the projects in the minor improvements database will be reprioritised.

 

The Lucas Terrace Upgrade was removed from budgets as this upgrade will be funded by the developer as the development is the only benefactor.

 

2.9.     Consultation

The Council recognises that it has obligations to seek the views of the local community on issues, plans and strategies that may directly or indirectly affect them. It also wants to encourage best practice by engaging public involvement for transport schemes in order to create a sense of ownership by local residents and to ensure that residents, businesses and stakeholders have the opportunity to provide valuable input.

Additional budgets have been included in all transport schemes to provide public engagement. This is to ensure the Council makes informed decisions and that Stakeholders are getting value for money. Views will be considered and responded as is appropriate. We will provide information regarding the outcome of the decision making process and the reasons for the decision.

Key principles of public engagement that the Council wish to improve on, are building consultation into the planning process from the start, and providing access to information by various means to cater to the needs of all people.

2.10.   Procurement Strategy

This Strategy documents Nelson City Council’s approach to procurement of activities funded through the National Land Transport Programme.

The Strategy aims to achieve desired outcomes and quality at the lowest overall whole of life cost and sustain a pool of suppliers in the region of varying sizes and capabilities to meet the needs of the Council.

The objectives of this Procurement Strategy are:

·      To attain value for money;

·      To encourage competitive and efficient markets;

·      To enable fair competition;

·      To operate an efficient procurement process.

Maintenance contracts have been reviewed and grouped to provide a good balance between price and quality, and use either prequalification or price/quality supplier selection methods. The methods used to procure capital projects will differ depending on the size of the project, but will be either lowest price or price/quality.

Council maintains an in-house professional services capability balanced with external consultants as required to achieve best value for money. Additional professional services are sometimes required and will be procured following the guidelines of the NZ Transport Agency Procurement Manual whereby a supplier will be directly appointed for contracts under $100,000, and a closed contest will be used for work between $100,000 and $200,000. The supplier selection method will be determined depending on the services being procured, but will commonly be price/quality.

2.11.   Prioritisation Process for Projects

The Council recognises that it has obligations to seek the views of the local community on issues, plans and strategies that may directly or indirectly affect residents. It also wants to encourage best practice by engaging public involvement for transport schemes in order to create a sense of ownership by local residents and to ensure that residents, businesses and stakeholders have the opportunity to provide valuable input.

Projects identified for funding in the Regional Land Transport Plan are subject to prioritisation through the Regional Land Transport Plan development process. This relies on the NZ Transport Agency investment and revenue framework.


3.       What’s the direction?

3.1.     Context

The Transport Asset Management Plan has to take long term higher level direction from the GPS and short term direction from the Regional Land Transport Strategy. The long term vision and mission underpinning the Regional Land Transport Strategy is:

“A sustainable transport future for Nelson”

and

“To have a land transport system that is safe, efficient, integrated and responsive and that meets the needs of the region in ways that are environmentally, socially and economically sustainable”.

The Draft Regional Land Transport Plan 2015 – 2021 (under development) sets out the subsidised transport priorities for the next three years that contribute to the vision for the region in accordance with the GPS on Land Transport.

The RLTS has been superceded by the 2015-2021 RLTP. The objectives contained in the RLTP are split into regional and local objectives as follows:

 

GPS Objectives

Regional Objectives

Policy/Direction

Measures of success for our communities

A land transport system that addresses current and future demand

 

1) A sustainable transport system that is integrated with well planned development, enabling the efficient and reliable movement of people and goods to, from and throughout the region

2) Supporting economic growth through providing better access across the Top of the South’s key journey routes

Target investment in regional route improvements to key journey routes

Consider Top of the South options to collaborate and improve road operations and maintenance delivery mechanisms

Target investment in projects that reduce travel times and vehicle operating costs on key journey routes

Develop and apply ONRC transition plans and programmes to close the Customer Level of Service gaps

 

Travel times between SH 6/60 and Port Nelson, and on SH1 between Picton and the Marlborough boundary are consistent

Reduction in the distance per capita travelled in single occupancy vehicles

ONRC is fully established by 2018

Routes available to HPMV increase over time

 

A land transport system that is reliable and resilient

 

3) Communities have access to a resilient transport system

4) Communities have access to a reliable transport system

Reduce the risk of disruption on lifeline routes

Improve network resilience along key journey routes

Improve network reliability along key journey routes

 

Reduction in the number of hours that sections of the key journey routes are closed due to unplanned disruptions

Travel time variability on our key journeys does not increase

 

GPS Objectives

Nelson Objectives

Policy/Direction

Measures of success for our communities

A land transport system that addresses current and future demand

 

1) A sustainable transport system that is integrated with well planned development, enabling the efficient and reliable movement of people and goods to, from and throughout the region

2) Supporting economic growth through providing better access across the Top of the South’s key journey routes.

Target investment in regional route improvements to key journey routes

Consider Top of the South options to collaborate and improve road operations and maintenance delivery mechanisms

Target investment in projects that reduce travel times and vehicle operating costs on key journey routes

Develop and apply ONRC transition plans and programmes to close the Customer Level of Service gaps

Travel time variability on SH6 and Waimea Road are consistent

 

Reduction in the distance per capita travelled in single occupancy vehicles

 

ONRC is fully embedded by 2018

 

Routes available to HMPV increase over time

 

A land transport system that is reliable and resilient

 

3) Communities have access to a resilient transport system.

4) Communities have access to a reliable transport system.

Reduce the risk of disruption on lifeline routes

Improve network resilience along key journey routes

Improve network reliability along key journey routes

Reduction in the number of hours that key journey routes are closed due to unplanned disruptions

Travel time variability on SH6 and Waimea Road are consistent

A land transport system that provides appropriate transport choices

 

N1) Communities have access to a range of travel choices to meet their social, economic, health and cultural needs

N2) Enable access to social and economic opportunities by investing in public transport

Extend walking and cycling networks and improve urban routes for cyclists where this can be achieved at reasonable cost

Maintain and grow public transport patronage by reconfigured and extended networks and improved ticketing methods

Increase in total trips travelled by walking, cycling, and public transport at peak times

 

Increase in total trips travelled by walking, cycling, and public transport

A land transport system that appropriately mitigates the effects of land transport on the environment.

 

N3)The transport system supports national strategies for energy efficiency and climate change, and protects natural systems and community values

Invest in local environmental mitigation measures with investment targeted on the most adverse cases

Invest in methods to reduce fuel related vehicle operating costs

Invest in travel demand management measures and infrastructure that enables more efficient trips

Reduction in the distance per capita travelled in single occupancy vehicles in Nelson

Increase in total trips travelled by walking, cycling, and public transport at peak times

Increase in total trips travelled by walking, cycling, and public transport

A land transport system that is a safe system, increasingly free of deaths and serious injury

 

N4) Deaths and serious injuries on the Nelson network are reduced at reasonable cost

Adopt a ‘Safe System Approach’ to road transport

Ensure road safety audits are undertaken on new roads or improvements to roads

Safety budgets targeted to improvements that deliver road safety improvements with a focus on reducing deaths and serious injuries.

Increase safe cycling through improvement of cycle networks

Reducing trend in deaths and serious injuries on the transport network

A flat or declining number of cycle crashes on the network

A declining number of pedestrian crashes on the network

 

3.2.     What Are The Impacts of Moving People and Goods?

While the transport services and assets associated with this activity are primarily focussed on the safe, efficient and effective transport of people and goods around the region it is important for Council to recognise the potential negative effects on the community. Briefly these are summarised as:

Economic

·      The economic cost resulting from road congestion;

·      The economic cost resulting from operating, maintenance, renewal and investing in transport assets and services;

Environmental

·      Air, water and particle pollution from motor vehicles;

·      Disturbance of the natural environment from road construction;

·      Contribution to climate change.

Social

·      Noise and community severance from busy roads;

·      Social cost of road congestion, accidents and injuries;

·      Health effects from transport infrastructure which either inhibits, or does not promote, physical activity.

3.3.     A Brief History of Street Design and Improvements Programme

Historically transport development in Nelson has pursued infrastructure improvements that have primarily focussed on catering for predicted future traffic volumes. The greatest contributor to the city’s roading network has been through residential and industrial growth. The progressive standardisation of street design in new subdivisions and industrial estates, determined by varying versions of the Engineering Standards, can be seen throughout the city.

With expansion into the hillsides as flat land is becoming scarce; the impact of the standards on development costs and the environment has led to a demand for less onerous standards which reduce the impact on the environment. At the same time the costs of Council’s own roading improvements, fundamentally based on providing footpaths in the older subdivisions where they were not built at the time of the original development, has increased dramatically as the flatter streets are completed and the costlier hillside streets are prioritised. Indications also showed that the public were particularly concerned about vehicle speeds in residential streets. Questions started to be asked about the necessity for footpaths in every street (however narrow or hilly) as being the key driver for a large proportion of transport expenditure.

The Land Development Manual 2010 addressed many of these issues and was welcomed by the local construction industry and key stakeholders. It provided a more holistic approach to the transport network and set down the fundamental importance of sustainable road design, road hierarchy and accessibility. This change was reflected by Council planners by prioritising the following plan changes:

·      Plan Change 21 – Parking and related changes;

·      Plan Change 18 – Nelson South;

·      Plan Change 17 – Enner Glynn and Brook Valley structure plan;

·      Plan Change 14 – Residential subdivision, Land Development Manual and Comprehensive housing;

·      Plan Change 13 – Marsden Valley.

The new direction signalled by the Land Development Manual and the Plan changes is now incorporated into all Council’s transport actions.

So historically, street upgrades that have been driven by a footpath prioritisation programme have been using most of Council’s capital expenditure programme, including renewals and reseals funding which could have been spent on maintaining the existing transport infrastructure.

The 2009 and 2012 Asset Management Plans recognised that there was an increasing level of deferred maintenance resulting from this funding strategy and diverted the renewals and reseals funding to maintaining the existing transport infrastructure.

The 2013 Residents survey shows that the Transport activity remains the one Council activity the public are most dissatisfied with. Figure 3.2 shows that Transport is the one activity that ratepayers would like to see Council putting more effort into based on the 2013 resident survey. This data was not collected in the 2014 survey.


 

Figure 3.1     2013 Residents Survey – Activities Which Residents Would Like Council To Put More Effort Into

In Council’s 2011 Annual Plan further changes were made with the deferment of several hillside street upgrades and an increase in street lighting and minor improvements funding.

In 2011 Council recognised that the Community has a high demand for Passenger Transport improvements and initiated increasing service frequency by increasing parking charges to fund improvements.

3.4.     What Are The Options?

Transport choices made today will determine the competitiveness, quality of life and resilience of Nelson for decades to come.

If we do nothing but maintain the existing network, public dissatisfaction with transport can be expected to increase.

The Draft Government Policy Statement clearly expects regions to focus investment on projects and services that offer increased economic growth and productivity, while also providing value for money through good asset management to improve the performance of the local networks and road safety. It is important to recognise the following impacts which the Draft Government Policy Statement expects and which relate more to the local transport networks:

·      A secure and resilient transport network;

·      More transport choices, particularly for those with limited access to a car;

·      Improvements in the provision of infrastructure and services that enhance transport efficiency and lower the cost of transportation through better use of existing transport networks;

·      Reductions in adverse environmental effects from land transport;

·      Reductions in road deaths and serious injuries as a result of road crashes.


The advantage of following the Draft Government Policy Statement path is the opportunity to build future resilience into the network and at the same time contribute towards the direction identified in the Council’s 2060 (Sustainability) Strategy. Optimisation of our existing network combined with a lesser reliance on private vehicles and a greater encouragement of other modes can lead to:

·      lower energy costs;

·      increased quality of life;

·      greater value for money;

·      fast, safe, affordable transportation;

·      vibrant streets and green areas;

·      clean and healthy environment;

·      cities for people.

3.5.     A Balanced Approach

The 2012 Transport Asset Management Plan adopted a “balanced approach” towards transport in Nelson and that approach has been continued through to this Plan.

Nationally and internationally, current transport planning has supported the encouragement of sustainable and alternative forms of transport for many years now, and Nelson has been at the forefront of actively supporting these forms of transport for over 15 years. Nelson has adopted a strategic momentum towards providing greater quality transport choices through the Asset Management Plans, the Regional Land Transport Strategy, Plan Changes and Council’s strategic sustainability policies. This has been effective in improving the walking and cycling networks in Nelson, and has supported the development of improved reliable public transport that offer viable options to residents. Nelson has developed a distinct travel choice culture.

This approach is fundamental to this TAMP and to the continued integrated delivery of projects by NCC over coming years. This will result in lower cost local road upgrades which are fit for purpose, provide opportunities for travel choices optimised whenever any project permits, and the travel needs of all road users recognised and catered for as feasible. In doing so Council:

·      Recognises the importance of well located, strong transport corridors that offer the potential for the efficient and safe flow of people and freight to assist the economic vitality of our region; and

·      Acknowledges that more integrated approaches to traffic flow (the importance of slower speeds and placing a greater emphasis on walking, cycling and a sense of place) are necessary on our local roads and residential streets to promote social and community networks, supportive neighbourhoods, urban centres and safe streets.


4.       The delivery of a balanced approach

This Asset Management Plan sets out how this balanced approach, initially implemented in the 2012 AMP, is to be delivered in a cost effective manner. It aligns Council’s expenditure to its strategic planning direction while at the same time positions itself to qualify for national funding by aligning with Government direction wherever possible.

The following six focus areas are proposed:

·      Local roads including walking, cycling and schools;

·      Arterial traffic, including freight;

·      Safety;

·      Public transport;

·      Parking;

·      Value for money principles.

Appendix E identifies how these focus areas link to Councils strategic plans and the Government’s desired impacts.

This section identifies levels of service, performance indicators, three year performance targets, the current performance level and preliminary details of the projects, activities and plans proposed to deliver the performance targets.

Funding has been allocated to these focus areas at a higher level than the total transport expenditure in recent years in recognition of the improvement that is necessary in the transport activity to bring its public satisfaction rating into line with Councils other assets and activities.

4.1.     Defining the Targets and the Delivery

This section identifies the levels of service, performance indicators, three year performance targets, the current performance level and preliminary details of the projects, activities and plans proposed to deliver the performance targets.

Performance targets identified below are for three years because the Asset Management Plan is reviewed every three years. Council has ten year targets in the Regional Land Transport Plan which are reported on annually to the Regional Transport Committee.

The performance targets don’t always directly relate to the implementation package as in most cases it is difficult to measure the impacts of the packages over the short term and targets have to be SMART[1].

Section 261B of the Local Government Act 2002 (Amendment Act 2010) specifies that the Secretary for Local Government must make rules specifying performance measures in relation to the provision of roads and footpaths. This rule was published in February 2014 and is now operative.

4.2.     Local Roads, Walking, Cycling and Schools

These services provide the essential services that contribute to the community outcome of People-friendly places – “We build healthy, accessible and attractive places and live in a sustainable region”. The service levels are fundamental in delivering softer approaches to traffic management (the importance of slower speeds and placing a greater emphasis on walking, cycling and a sense of place) to promote social and community networks, supportive neighbourhoods and safe streets.

A service level statement for the road network identifying the basic transport needs follows:

·      Roads are safe to use and provide a comfortable and reliable means of travel.

·      The footpath and cycle network is considered to be suitable, accessible, safe and well maintained.

·      Road markings are maintained to provide clear delineation and direction for roads, parking, and cycle lanes at all times.

·      Bridges and related structures are designed and maintained to provide safe access across the network.

·      Traffic signals are designed and maintained to improve traffic flow in the roading network.

·      Appropriate signage is maintained to enable safe and efficient way finding across the transport network.

·      Adequate street lighting is maintained to enable safe neighbourhoods and easy night driving on all urban streets.

·      Stormwater is removed efficiently from road surfaces.

4.2.1.   Walking and Cycling

The guiding level of service relating to walking and cycling is:

Table 4.1       Level of Service Relating to Walking and Cycling

Level of Service

Performance Indicator

Performance Target

Walking and cycling are easy and attractive alternative transport choices.

Percentage of the community that travel to work by walking or cycling (based on Nelson City Council Annual Residents Survey and/or national census).

25% of all journeys to work trips are by walking or cycling by 2018.

Table 4.2       Level of Service Relating to Maintenance of Footpaths

Level of Service

Performance Indicator

Current Performance

Performance Target

MAINTENANCE

The Network, and its services in good condition and are “fit for purpose”

The percentage of footpaths that meet or exceed the maximum acceptable roughness*

95%

95% of the footpath network by length has a condition rating of ≤ 3

The measure Council uses to monitor walking and cycling is the journey to work data as it is a Census question as well as a question in Council’s annual residents’ survey. Figure 4.1 below shows the journey to work data from 1996 to 2013 from the census and Figure 4.2 shows similar data from the annual residents’ survey.


Figure 4.1     Journey to Work Data

The graph above shows that over half of the population travel to work by car, truck or van, although a higher proportion walk or cycle in Nelson than the rest of the country, averaging around 17% of all journeys to work.


Figure 4.2     Main Means of Travel to Work

In the 2014 residents’ survey 16% of journey to work trips were by walking and cycling. This was slightly less than previous years although it is worth noting that the absolute numbers of residents travelling by these modes increased.

The condition of the footpaths is of particular interest to the community, especially relating to the surface condition and how this relates to safe use by the increasing number of elderly and disabled residents. Council has developed a new condition rating for use locally. Table 4.3 shows the descriptions of each rating as well as the percentage, by length, of the footpath network that meets the criteria.

Table 4.3       Footpath Rating Descriptions and Summary

Rating

Description

Percentage length with rating (2014)

1

As new, no significant cracking, even surface.

15%

2

Good condition, safe to use, some minor cracking and/or scabbing/ravelling.

48%

3

Average condition, could be some cracking, scabbing/ravelling and/or untidy but safe to use, no significant hazards.

32%

4

Poor condition, will need maintenance in near future, cracking more significant, may be some settlement or sections may be lifting, surface may be uneven, small bumps or ruts forming, broken edges, lichen, service covers may be raised or low.

4%

5

Very poor condition, needs to be fixed now, not safe to use, significant tripping hazards, holes, humps and bumps, ruts and/or very uneven surface, service covers and/or tree roots hazardous.

1%

Table 4.3 shows that around 48% of the footpath network is in good condition with a further 32% in average but still safe condition.

4.2.2.   The Walk/Cycle/Schools Package

A Walk/Cycle/Schools Package of Capital Works was adopted by Council through the Regional Land Transport Programme in 2012-15 focussing on walking, cycling and infrastructure around schools. The objectives are:

·      To increase peak hour walking and cycling throughout the City (acknowledging that journey to school mode is critical to reducing congestion and achieving the other Regional Land Transport Strategy 2009 objectives).

·      Increasing walking and cycling at all other times.

This package is more than just the resolution of an issue. It is a strategic direction for a community with limited funds that has identified its direction through many strategic and policy documents (identified above). It aligns with many outcomes of the Government Policy Statement and allocates a share of the available regional funds to some local roading projects. A key driver for the support for this Package is the outcome of the Arterial Traffic Study which did not support the immediate progression of the southern arterial.

A range of projects and measures across all activities were selected to extract maximum value from previous investment, to complete significant network connections and to encourage a further step forward in opportunities to walk and cycle within Nelson. The package when completed will result in a well integrated network with overall greater network safety.

There were two State Highway network infrastructure projects critical to making walking and cycling an easy choice for Nelson. These are aimed at providing increased walking and cycling opportunities on or alongside state highways and providing connection to the local network facilities.

The proposed local infrastructure projects went towards completing separated cycle facilities across the city (including linkages to Richmond), allowing the full benefit of previous investment to be realised. New off road facilities from the Central Business District to the Port along the banks of the Maitai River will provide excellent connections for pedestrians, children, and less confident cyclists. On-road facilities will fill the missing links in the key routes from Tahunanui to Stoke. These key projects will be supported by a number of smaller projects which will provide linkages within parks and reserves, better lighting of roads and cycleways, and improved cycle parking.

The following projects are programmed for the 2015-2018 period covered by this Asset Management Plan under the walk/cycle/schools package:

·      Rocks Road shared path;

·      Tahunanui to Stoke cycle link;

·      Maitai path bridge across Saltwater Creek.

·     

·      The Maitai to Rocks Road link was added to the Walk Cycle Schools package in order to meet the funding criteria for the Urban Cycleways Fund.

Targets for the package are:

·      Extend and further develop existing key walking and cycling networks.

·      Target schools to make walking and cycling for schools children easier and safer, thereby reducing peak hour vehicle congestion.

·      Reductions in deaths and serious injuries as a result of road crashes.

·      More transport choices, particularly for those with limited access to a car.

·      Reductions in adverse environmental effects from land transport.

·      Contributions to positive health outcomes.

4.2.3.   Local Road Maintenance and Renewals

The guiding level of service relating to local road maintenance and renewals is:

Table 4.4       Level of Service Relating to Local Road Maintenance and Renewals

Level of Service

Performance Indicator

Current Performance

Performance Target

MAINTENANCE

The Network, and its services in good condition and are “fit for purpose”

Smooth Travel Exposure*

87%

87% based on NZ Transport Agency standard roughness limits in ONRC

The Network, and its services in good condition and are “fit for purpose”

Average road roughness standard (National Association of Australian State Roading Authorities) by road classification.

Local, 106

Rural Sealed, 97

The following maximum average road roughness are not exceeded:

Local,120

Rural sealed, 120

The Network, and its services in good condition and are “fit for purpose”

The percentage of the local road (non State Highway) that is resurfaced*

4.8%

7.4%

Every formed Council owned road is recorded in the Road Asset Maintenance Management database. This database records pavement and surfacing, streetlights, footpaths, construction and maintenance history, inspection data and traffic volumes.

NZ Transport Agency uses the National Association of Australian State Roading Authorities[2] reading to determine the average road roughness. Nelson City Council has used National Association of Australian State Roading Authorities ratings to determine if additional funding is necessary to maintain the roads to an adequate roughness level. Figure 4.5 below shows the current average road roughness standard (National Association of Australian State Roading Authorities) by road classification. This shows a long-term decline (improvement) in roughness linearly, but an increase (worsening) in roughness during the last year for principal, sub collector and local roads.


 

Figure 4.3     Average Road Roughness Standards (National Association of Australian State Roading Authorities) by Road Classification

Smooth Travel Exposure (STE) provides a measure of the proportion of vehicle travel that occurs on roads that meet the roughness limits. Due to the complications in assessing the financial implications of committing to a higher target than already being achieved further analysis will be undertaken once the ONRC is operative. The current level of STE is expected to be maintained for the next three years due to the resurfacing of a large section of Waimea Road and has been used as the performance target in this AMP. A new limit will be set for the next Transport Asset Management Plan once the new ONRC results can be interrogated.

The upper limit of the performance target of 7.4% of the network to be resurfaced annually has been set based on the area estimated as able to be resurfaced with the budgets detailed above. The lower limit of 5.4% of the target allows for some level of uncertainty associated with the cost fluctuations in raw materials increases in contract labour costs and poor ground conditions. The range also allows for the programme to be changed should opportunities for further optimisation be identified.

4.2.4.   Road Surfaces

Up until the last six years, NZTA supported the use of theoretical seal lives that had been previously published by their predecessor, Transit NZ in 2005. Since then, Councils have been required to extend the life of all of the pavement surfaces that they maintain until all of their practical life has been utilised. In order to provide some assessment of the likely future costs associated with maintaining Nelsons roads, a revised seal life table has been developed that more accurately reflects the practical life of the sealed surfaces in Nelson. These seal lives have been based on the following factors:

·      The current age of the existing surfaces

·      The age of the surfaces programmed for reseal after visual inspection

·      The experience of Council’s road maintenance staff

The practical seal lives are shown in Table 4.5 with each entry colour coded according to the confidence that Council officers have for each particular entry. Green represents areas of very high confidence, orange represents moderate to high confidence and red represents low confidence.

Table 4.5       Practical seal lives in Nelson

While the table above seems to illustrate a high level of uncertainty overall, the areas shown in red do not represent a very high proportion of the sealed area in the Nelson road network. The proportion of each surface type and corresponding traffic volume range is shown in Table 4.6.


 

Table 4.6       Proportion of Road Surface in Nelson by Type and Traffic Volume

Table 4.6 shows that almost all of the road network (approximately 93%), by area, is of a type that there is high confidence in the practical surface life. The revised surface life table is therefore considered to be fit for purpose in assessing the likely forward renewal cost of the sealed surface.

It is noted that the practical surface life table above details lives for each surface type in a location that is appropriate. For example, AC16 will almost always last a lot longer if used in the same location as AC10. In practice though, AC16 is never used in the same location and is instead reserved for use in much higher stress situations.

Currently there is a change in seal technology towards more environmentally sound and safer to use products. Further effect on the seal lives are driven by the changes in the New Zealand vehicles fleet to front wheel power steering cars in particular. These newer vehicles put the road surface under additional stress.

With these changes comes uncertainly around the life of the surfaces. As a result the surface life table will need to remain a live document that is revised regularly to reflect the latest information that Council has about its road surfaces. The table will be updated at least every three years after the major inspection and programming of critical surfaces for resurfacing that takes place in order to inform both the next Transport AMP and RLTP.

The practical seal life table allows an assessment of the whole network how much of it is due for reseal in each year. To follow this, a likely cost can be calculated. The following assumptions were made in undertaking this assessment.

·      All asphalted surfaces will be replaced with asphalt at an average cost of $30/m2

·      All non-asphalt surfaces will be replaced with a two coat grade 3/5 chipseal or similar at an average cost of $6.80/m2

·      Council staff time programming and managing the reseals is 4% of the total cost

·      Lifting services and remarking is 5% of the total cost

Figure 4.4 shows the projected resealing maintenance (or backlog) liability, proposed spend and remaining liability after spend for each of the ten years beginning in the 2015/16 financial year.

Figure 4.4     Expected Future Resurfacing Costs/Liability

In summary Figure 4.4 shows the following:

·      There is a very large backlog of surfaces that have exceeded their practical lives and need to be replaced urgently. This is supported by Council staff observations that have shown that they have been unable to reseal all of the critical surfaces in the 2014/15 financial year and as a result will need to undertake more repair work.

·      If Council was to catch up and keep up with the reseals that are needed, when they are needed then around $6.3M would need to be spent in the 2015/16 financial year followed by $1.3M and $1.1M for the two years following.

·      It is proposed to spread the backlog over the next 8 years as shown by the red bars. This results in a spend of $1.33M each year for the 2015/16, 16/17 and 17/18 financial years followed by $1.4M each year for the following three years. The spend then drops to around $1.1M from 2021/22. The spend in each year includes a proportion of the backlog plus the area due for replacement in that particular year with the backlog likely to be prioritised first.

·      Even though the backlog has been spread over eight years the discharging of the overall maintenance liability associated with the reseals essentially takes a full 10 years from 2015/16.

Of note is the fact that the presence of this backlog will result in a future ‘hump’ that will occur approximately every 15-16 years requiring an annual investment of around $2.8M at peak. This does not show in the ten year period covered by this Transport AMP but first begins to appear again in around 2030/31.

Figure 4.5 shows the Surface Condition Index, which is a measure of various survey faults (cracking, flushing, potholes, rutting, scabbing, shoving, patches) and surface age. (The lower the surface condition index the better the pavement is). The figure shows an improvement in the Surface Condition Index since 2008 after a significant increase (worsening) between 2004 and 2008.

Figure 4.5     Road Network Surface Condition

 

The results in Figure 4.7 above show that we are effectively managing the aged surfaces by targeting those in worst condition. More high volume roads in the network have been asphalted which has further contributed to the improvement in the Surface Condition Index. This data is a snap-shot in time only and does not provide any assessment of future maintenance needs in time to allow effective response to any issues.

4.2.5.   Pavement Renewals

For pavement renewals Council utilises field measurements, maintenance history and engineering judgement to programme works. The quality of renewals undertaken may be affected by the requirement to justify planned works with NZ Transport Agency prior to funding approval. Works which cannot be justified from a whole of life maintenance analysis will not receive a subsidy and as a result may be deferred. Funding applications are yet to be completed for the renewals work identified in section 5.3.3 so at this stage the extent of deferred renewals, if any, is unknown.

4.2.6.   Implementation Package for Local Roads, Walking and Cycling and Schools

4.2.7.   Walking, Cycling and Schools

There is a clear correlation in Nelson between arterial congestion in the peak hours and school term times. Around 56% of New Zealand children are driven to school each day, increasing from 45% in 1998.

Driving to school instead of walking reduces children’s physical activity and increases traffic congestion and air pollution. Nearly every part of the city is within 500m from a school, which is considered an acceptable walking distance for most children. Clearly improving the walking and cycling facilities around schools has the potential to change the way students travel to school and alleviate peak hour congestion at the same time.

Some of the projects, activities and plans proposed that relate to schools are:

·      Encourage Walking School Buses, Feet First & Walk to School promotions, Bike Wise, and other events and activities designed to promote and encourage using active transport as a mode of travel to and from school, with liaison with the schools.

·      Improvement of School Entrances and frontages to encourage active modes.

·      Increased parking enforcement around schools.

·      Delivery of cycle skills education courses in both schools (and the wider community) as part of the regional RIDE ON cycle strategy. This strategy includes working alongside recreational providers to run activities that encourages cycling in general and in particular safe cycling practice.

·      Ongoing encouragement of active modes delivered through council publications and media such as Live Nelson.

4.2.8.   Local Roads

Local roading investment requires expanding if overall service levels are to be maintained. In 2012 the reseal budget was increased although the roading maintenance budgets were frozen and have not kept pace with the expansion of the network though subdivision development, or inflation. This has led to deterioration in the performance of the network.

Additional local roading maintenance and renewal projects proposed to maintain the existing level of service are:

·      Increase sealed pavement maintenance budgets from $469,000 to $500,000.

·      Resurfacing budget from $1.33 million/year for the first three years before increasing to $1.4 million for years 4-6 and then reducing to $1.1million/year for year 6-9 to ensure the sealed surfaces keep the high value base course layers dry.

·      Increase structural replacement programme for bridges and retaining walls via the structures component replacement budget of approximately $330,000 pa.

·      Increase for streetlight renewals costing approximately $270,000/year to allow the replacement of poor performing lights with LED luminaries.

·      Provide a pavement renewal budget in the order of $350 pa.

·     

·      The LTP has amended the following:

·      For years 6-9, the reseal budget remains at $1.4 million.

·      Structures component replacement budget reduced to $295,000 in year 1 but increased to $500,000 in year 2.

·      It is noted that the level of funding to be received from NZTA is less than originally budgeted for maintenance and renewals. There is potential for additional funding to become available from the NZ Transport Agency in years 2 and 3. In response, Council has retained the renewals budget in years 2 and 3. This will ensure that the local share will be available should NZTA provide further funding. If not, the renewals budget will be varied in these years at the annual plan stage.

Other local roading capital projects proposed to improve the Levels of Service are:

·      Continue to implement street lighting upgrade programme to enable safe and easy night time driving, and expansion of lighting to shared walk/cycleways such as the Railway reserve.

·      Safety upgrades at the intersection of Toi Toi Street and St Vincent Street.

·      Upgrade only those roads where traffic volumes, safety issues or utilities upgrades justify a full upgrade.

·      Increase in the Minor Improvement Programme to $650,000 pa.

·      Finish implementation of the walking/cycling and schools package identified in the Regional Land Transport Programme 2012-15. Note that it is not intended to update the Council’s Pedestrian Strategy (2005) or Cycling Strategy (2006). Nelson is far enough advanced in its walking and cycling implementation that it would not add any benefit to its Walk / Cycle funding package, rather walking and cycling is included in this AMP and in the RLTP.

·      Continue to enhance the Central Business District through works identified in Heart of Nelson and other new priorities. $100,000 has been allowed for in year 1 and $500,000/year for years 2-10.

·      Provide a footpath improvement budget of $50,000 for the first year for design and the $200,000/year for years 2-10 to provide missing footpath links.

The budgets for CBD enhancement were changed to $50,000 in year 1, $250,000 in years 2 and 3 and $300,000 in year 4. No budget has been allocated for years 5-10.

POLICY NOTE: - With the installation of the ultra fast broadband cabling in many streets and footpaths there is an opportunity to provide a small proportion of funding to resurface the total width of the footpaths when the trenches are being reinstated. This is excellent value for money although the opportunity to upgrade these footpaths to the 2010 Land Development Manual standards is limited. It is proposed that the footpath renewals budget be utilised to facilitate this and similar future opportunities.

Other local roading capital projects proposed to cater for growth are:

·      Rural Road seal extensions - It is proposed to use recycled asphalt millings to seal rural roads. These will not be reconstructed to full Land Development Manual standard but surfaced to minimise the ongoing maintenance required, reduce dust issues and improve safety.

·      Todd Bush Road.

·      Marsden / Ridgeway intersection.

Council has an ownership responsibility to manage the road reserve in a cost effective, sustainable, well planned and coordinated manner to agreed levels of service. Council has a number of individual policy and procedures, many of which require updating. It is proposed that an overarching Road Management Policy is developed to include:

·      Road Reserve Management Policy and Procedures;

·      Road Reserve Operations and Maintenance Policy;

·      Road Occupation Policy (Structures on Road Reserve);

·      Parking Policy;

·      Road Stopping, Sale and Acquisitions Policy;

·      Speed complaints procedure;

·      Signage Policy;

·      Power and Telecom Undergrounding Policy;

·      Roading Improvement Policy.

4.3.     Arterial Traffic

These service levels provide the other half of a balanced network approach by recognising the importance of well located, strong transport corridors that offer the potential for the efficient and safe flow of people and goods to assist the economic vitality of our region. The service levels contribute to the government outcomes providing “an efficient transport system that supports high levels of economic productivity, provides strong international connections for freight, business and tourism, and meets international obligations” and the community outcome of people friendly places - “We build healthy, accessible and attractive places and live in a sustainable region”.

Council’s main arterial corridor is from the Queen Elizabeth II / Haven Road roundabout, along Haven Road, Halifax Street, Rutherford Street, Waimea Road and Main Road Stoke and the link from the State Highway / Annesbrook roundabout to Main Road Stoke along Annesbrook Drive. The other corridor routes, between Annesbrook roundabout and the Beatson Road roundabout, and along the state highways are owned and managed by NZ Transport Agency.

Delays in arterial traffic travel times and a widening of the peak travel periods are an indication of inefficient use of transport routes and have a negative impact on economic productivity. By monitoring travel times and peak spread on key routes we can see whether these routes are efficient. Appendix H shows graphically the peak spread and delays on the Rocks Road and Waimea Road corridors.

The current average delays have been measured to be 3 minute on Rocks Road and 2 minutes on Waimea Road. It is noted that the dataset for this measurement is very small due to the complexities associated with collecting the data. Nelson City Council has partnering with NZTA and installed a wireless detection system to measure travel times. This improvement in technology will allow a much larger sample to be collected and improve the effectiveness of this measure.

Table 4.7       Level of Service Relating to Efficient Transport System

Level of Service

Performance Indicator

Performance Target

An efficient transport system that enables people and freight to move efficiently.

Average AM and PM peak hour travel times on Waimea Road and the State Highway between Annesbrook and Haven Road roundabout.

Average peak hour travel time delays are no greater than 5 minutes above uncongested travel times.

The Nelson to Brightwater Corridor Study model provides levels of service for the transport corridors. Generally a level of service of C or above is considered appropriate for local arterial transport roads. The definition of the level of service along with classification of the key corridors is provided in Appendix F.

The 2009 modelling predicts that current levels of service are below C around the three roundabouts which connect the State Highway 6 to Main Road Stoke and Salisbury Road, close to the Nelson/Tasman boundary and along parts of Waimea Road. Observations of these intersections confirm that they continue to operate at a level of service worse than C and are likely to continue to in the foreseeable future.

The 5 minute delay defined as the performance target represents an average delay of around 1 minute per kilometre over the measured distance. Based on the Austroads Guide to Traffic Management Part 3: Traffic Studies and Analysis, Sections 5.2.2 and 5.2.3, this level of delay is expected to result in a level of service of C for the route as a whole. The descriptions of the level of service flow characteristics contained in the Austroads guide are similar to those contained in Appendix F.

Nelson City Council has used National Association of Australian State Roading Authorities ratings to determine if additional funding is necessary to maintain the roads to an adequate roughness level. Figure 4.3 shows the current average road roughness standard (National Association of Australian State Roading Authorities) by road classification, along with proposed target levels.

Table 4.8       Level of Service relating to Road Network and Its Services

Level of Service

Performance Indicator

Performance Target

The network, and its services in good condition and are "fit for purpose".

Average road roughness standard (National Association of Australian State Roading Authorities) by road classification.

The following maximum average road roughness are not exceeded:

Arterial/Principal, 100

Collector/Sub C, 110.

4.3.1.   Implementation Package for Arterial Traffic

Many of the local roading maintenance and renewal initiatives identified in 4.2 above also include, and prioritise the arterial roads. These budgets are not split between local and arterial roads and it is not considered necessary to do so, but the budgets allocated include all local roads and arterial roads.

The 2012 AMP included an action to update the transportation modelling, undertaken as part of the Arterial Traffic Study, once the 2013 census data became available. Closer examination of the traffic data on the main arterial routes has shown that, while all of the growth in population and households assumed in the model has been realised, the arterial traffic volumes have been reducing to a level well below those predicted in the model. As a result an update of the model will not change any of the Arterial Traffic Study recommendations other than to push the need for any works further into the future than previously recommended. It is proposed instead to monitor traffic volumes closely and look to update the model after the next census unless it is carried out sooner by the NZTA for the purposes of investigating the Southern Arterial.

Council has investigated some of the transport issues that relate to the poor peak hour travel time performance of the arterials, such as the arterial traffic study, the NZ Transport Agency / Nelson City Council / Tasman District Council three roundabouts study and the Waimea Road intersections.

Capital projects to improve the level of service and provide for future arterial traffic growth include:

·      Annesbrook Drive crossing facilities;

·      Update and review the transport model following the 2018 Census (in partnership with NZ Transport Agency and Tasman District Council as the model ownership is equally shared);

·      Provide off-street car parking in Tahunanui near the Bisley Avenue intersection to allow reinstatement of the two southbound through lanes;

·      Complete the cycle link on SH6 between the Crop and Food building and the recently completed Maitai walkway;

·      Rocks Road walking and cycling facilities;

·      Projects identified in the Regional Land Transport Plan;

·      Increase frequency of NBus on the arterial routes.

A number of intersection improvements proposed by the Arterial Traffic Study have been found to delay through traffic on the arterial roads to a level that any major improvements to the intersections cannot be progressed on economic grounds. Instead it is proposed to undertake more modest work in order to improve safety in particular.

4.4.     Safety

This service level is an essential part of managing the transport network and has been chosen to align with “Safer Journeys” which is the government’s strategy to guide improvements in road safety over the period 2010 to 2020. The strategy’s vision is “a safe road system increasingly free of death and serious injury”.

The safe system approach to road safety recognises that drivers make mistakes but should not die or be seriously injured as a result. As a local road controlling authority, Nelson City Council has a part to play in providing safe roads and roadsides along with safe speeds on the roads that it administers.

The road safety service level statement is:

“To work towards a safe road system increasingly free of death and serious injury”.

The Local Government Act 2002 requires all road controlling authorities to have a level of service relating to the number of fatalities and serious injuries and report on these annually.

 

Table 4.9       Level of Service Relating to Road Safety

Level of Service

Performance Indicator

Performance Target

Road safety.

Number of deaths and serious injuries in road crashes

Reducing at 4% per year from a base of 2007

Figure 4.6 below shows that since 2007 the number of fatalities and serious injuries on Nelsons Roads has fluctuated at or above the target maximum.

Figure 4.6     Number of Fatal and Serious Injuries on Local Roads in Nelson

Around half of all urban crashes on the network are at intersections, and of these intersection crashes, the worst intersections account for a significant proportion of the overall social cost.

Table 4.10     Level of Service Relating to Road Safety at Intersections

Level of Service

Performance Indicator

Performance Target

Road safety.

Annual social cost of crashes (injury and non-injury) at intersections.

The social cost for each year reduces by at least 4% per year from a base of 2007.

Figure 4.7 below compares the social costs of all intersection crashes since 2007.

Figure 4.7     Total Social Cost of Urban Intersection Crashes (Injury and Non-injury)

It is important that the focus on road safety is driven by robust criteria for selecting intersections for improvement works. As with anything associated with road safety it is critical that specialist road safety engineers assess any intersections identified to confirm the need for their inclusion in any forward work program.

In general, crash rates at intersections between local (non state highway) roads are lower than the thresholds that can justify standalone safety improvement works. Instead, the intersections with higher crash rates in the Nelson context will be treated via use of the minor improvements budget.

Nelson cyclists initially appear to be over represented in casualty data compared to other peer group locations. This measure of over representation has traditionally been the number of cycle crashes as a proportion of total crashes. This does not provide a reliable measure of performance when compared to the rest of peer group B (Palmerston North, Napier and Invercargill) as the number of people cycling on the network is not taken into account. Instead it is important that Nelson City strives to provide continued improvement to its cycle network to reduce the vulnerability of cyclists regardless of what other regions in New Zealand are achieving.

With the intention to continue to provide infrastructure and promote cycling in Nelson City it is important that any development of cycling infrastructure be done in a sustainable safe manner. As a result the indicator for cycle crashes recognises the likelihood of increased cycle use.

 

Table 4.11     Level of Service Relating to Road Safety and Cyclists

Level of Service

Performance Indicator

Three Year Performance Target

Road safety.

Number of crashes involving cyclists.

Nelson City cycle crash numbers do not increase from those in the base year of 2007.

 

 

 

Figure 4.8 shows that the number of crashes in the last three years has gradually increased to be above the target maximum of 23 crashes in any one year.

Figure 4.8     Number of Cyclist Crashes in Nelson City

The total social cost for cycle crashes measures the overall cost of the crashes in terms of medical, economic, productivity and physical cost associated with causalities in particular. In 2012 the total social cost of all cycle crashes in Nelson was $8.8M, a high for the last complete five year period. This reduced to around $5.7M in 2013. This measure provides some context in relating the cost of safety improvements for cyclists and the potential savings.

Pedestrian crashes in Nelson are typically clustered around the three main business districts in Nelson, Tahunanui and Stoke as well as around each of the schools in the area. In particular, any crash that involves a pedestrian has a much higher chance of resulting in serious injury or death. This results in relatively focused areas where safety related spending for pedestrians can be concentrated. With this in mind a falling cap of pedestrian related crashes is appropriate as follows.

Table 4.12     Level of Service Relating to Road Safety and Pedestrians

Level of Service

Performance Indicator

Three Year Performance Target

Road safety.

Number of crashes involving pedestrians.

The number of crashes involving pedestrians each year reduces by at least 4% per year from a base of 2007.

Figure 4.9 shows that the number of crashes involving pedestrians has increased above the number in 2007 and are not reducing in line with the target maximum. This indicates that further effort and spending in this area of road safety is needed.

Figure 4.9     Number of crashes involving pedestrians in Nelson City

4.4.1.   Implementation Package for Safety

The Safer Journeys: New Zealand’s Road Safety Strategy 2010-2020 published by the Ministry of Transport proposes a Safe System approach which focuses on creating safer roads, safe speeds, safe vehicles and safe road use. Clearly local authorities are tasked with three of these four focus areas, and delivering in these areas will also contribute to the levels of service identified above.

The Safe System approach is implemented in a coordinated way with other sectors of the Nelson Community (Tasman District Council, New Zealand Police, Accident Compensation Corporation, Nelson Marlborough District Health Board, NZ Transport Agency) through the Nelson Tasman Road Safety Action Plan.

Some of the projects, activities and plans proposed for safer roads are:

·      Intersection improvements, targeting high risk intersections.

·      Capital works providing improved walking and cycling facilities.

·      Targeted minor improvements programme focussing on schools, walking and central business district minor safety projects.

·      Improved line marking and street lighting.

Some of the projects, activities and plans proposed for safe speeds are:

·      Targeted minor improvements programme focussing on speed issues.

·      Speed limit reviews that consider changes over local roading areas i.e. around hospital and Waimea Road.

·      Local road treatments to reduce the speed environment such as through intersection changes, line marking upgrades, the installation of flush medians, installation of street trees etc, where appropriate.

·      Lobbying government to make changes to the Road User Rules to allow greater speed enforcement to be used to reduce speeds rather than rely on expensive road treatments.

·      Implementation of the speed reduction methods in the Land Development Manual and Shared space ideals when considering roading capital improvement projects.

·      Implementation of an urban speed reduction programme delivering stopping distance demonstrations, including emphasis on speed around schools, a “Wipe off 5” multimedia campaign (similar to that run in Victoria, Australia), and a community development and neighbourhood ownership programme calling for safer speeds and increased acceptance of traffic calming on local roads.

·      Install arterial pedestrian and cycle crossings.

Some of the projects, activities and plans proposed for safe road use are:

·      Campaigns that promote to motorists the “share the road” message will be run along with ongoing support for data collection through 0800CYCLECRASH.

·      Youth Education and information initiatives to this high risk sector will continue to be delivered.

·      Continuation of the RYDA programme which co-ordinates the efforts of local road safety experts, driving instructors, the Police, recovering victims of road crashes, drug and alcohol educators and insurance and financial services personnel in such a way that 1500 year 11 students are made aware of the privilege, cost and responsibilities of owning and driving a motor vehicle.

·      Six motorcycle training courses using qualified instructors with at least two of these courses aimed at the younger scooter riders, publications on license requirements and a print based publication aimed at riders and other motorists.

4.5.     Public Transport

In early 2012 Council commenced an improved passenger transport service funded from increased parking charges. Council’s strategic direction on Passenger Transport is outlined in the Draft Regional Public Transport Plan [under development in 2014 in parallel with the Regional Land Transport Plan].

The service level is targeted towards providing the user with transport choices and as a means of reducing traffic congestion.

A review of the new service was undertaken in 2013. This review report can be found at A1119385. The review found that the service is operating well on the arterial routes. However the collector routes are less successful.

In 2014 some early and late services on the collector routes were cancelled to fund a weekend service on the Waimea Main Road Stoke Arterial Route.

Table 4.13     Level of Service Relating to Public Transport Services

Level of Service

Performance Indicator

Performance Target

Public transport services that meet the transport needs of the community with an equitable sharing of costs.

The farebox recovery ratio.

50%

Since the introduction of the NBus public transport system the fare recovery ratio has increase from around 60% in the 2012/13 year to 62% in 2013/14. Prior to this period the bus system was privately run and the fare recovery ratio is unknown.

4.5.1.   Implementation Package for Public Transport

·      Update and implement the Regional Public Transport Plan for 2015-18 including:

·      Increase network coverage in Stoke

·      Continue with public transport promotion to encourage an increase in patronage.

·      Continue with the bus shelter installations and upgrades.

·      Conduct user and non user surveys every 2 years and use feedback to improve services.

·      Construct additional infrastructure on hail and ride routes to increase visibility of service.

·      Continue to work with Tasman District Council with a view to improve the network coverage in Richmond

·      Implement real time bus tracking

4.6.     Parking

Parking revenue, sundry rents such as street dining and street stalls are used to fund the Inner City Enhancement account. Inner city expenditure covers many activities such as maintenance of the meters and brickwork, rental charges for private land occupied by the public, rates, grants for inner city co-ordinator, hanging baskets, Central Business District litter collection and depreciation, operations and maintenance, renewals and enhancement works. Council also recognised in the 2011 Annual Plan that increasing parking charges was a useful travel demand management tool to encourage sustainability and to optimise the networks resilience by using the additional income to subsidise the passenger transport improvements. Recently however, Council has indicated that the contribution to passenger transport will cease to come from the Inner City Parking account at the end of the 2014/15 financial year and come from general rates.

Currently, any surplus or deficit in the Inner City Parking account, once the contribution to passenger transport is made is transferred to or from the Parking Reserve and if there are not sufficient funds, the shortfall is borrowed. The Parking Reserve also acts as the balancing account for Parking Enforcement and the Millers Acre property account.

As most vehicular journeys involve parking at both the start and end of each trip, the availability and cost of car parking can influence decisions on transport mode used, the time of travel and, potentially, the choice of destination. The provision of parking facilities also impacts on the urban environment and may take up valuable space, thereby increasing property development costs.

A balance must be struck between the provision of an adequate supply of parking to meet the needs of a dynamic, competitive economy, optimising valuable city centre land and encouraging the use of good alternatives to single occupancy vehicles.

Essentially short stay parking should be of sufficient capacity, carefully costed, well located and accessible. Long stay parking should not compete with short stay capacity, and should align with the wider transport policy.

The Parking service level statement is:

“Parking is easy to use, and is rationed fairly and equitably”.

There are approximately 1,440 short stay parking spaces in the central core area; these had a peak midweek and Saturday occupancy in December 2012 of around 90%. This equates to around 140 free spaces in the central area at peak times. These peak times tend to be in the middle of the weekdays, between 11am and 4pm and between 11am and 12.30pm on Saturdays.

Table 4.14     Level of Service Relating to Short Stay Parking

Level of Service

Performance Indicator

Performance Target

The supply and pricing of short stay parking managed to encourage commercial activity in the city centre.

Percentage of short stay parking spaces occupied in midweek peak in December.

85%

Table 4.15     Level of Service Relating to Parking

Level of Service

Performance Indicator

Current Performance

Performance Target

PARKING

The supply and pricing of long stay parking is managed to incentivise greater use of travel options other than cars.

Occupancy of long-stay parking spaces between peak travel times measured at 5 locations within the CBD fringe.

Not currently measured but will be in the future.

A reducing trend.

Should occupancy rates drop constantly below the performance target then Council should consider relaxing the short stay time restrictions. Should occupancy rates be constantly above the performance target then Council should consider increasing parking fees or making more short stay spaces available within the CBD.

The distance recognised in the New Zealand Pedestrian Planning Guide as being the optimum maximum distance commuters should be expected to walk from their car to their work is 1.6 kilometres, which is a 20 minute walk at 5 kilometres/hour for a fit healthy adult (ie 450m takes 5 minutes and 900m takes 10 minutes). This distance puts much of the fringe area of the Central Business District within parking distance of the core of the Central Business District. Uncontrolled all day commuter parking currently occurs in many residential, commercial and light industrial areas of the Central Business District fringe area. It is important that as pressure on parking grows in the future this uncontrolled parking should be rationalised to minimise its impact on the viability and value of the fringe areas and more use of multiple occupant vehicles and public transport encouraged.

An acceptable walking distance is a relatively fluid concept. Some people happily walk many kilometres, while even short walks are difficult for the elderly, disabled or children. By far the majority of city centres are about 1km across. This means a walk of a kilometre or less will bring pedestrians around most of the functions of the city.

Table 4.16     Level of Service Relating to Long Stay Parking

Level of Service

Performance Indicator

Performance Target

The supply and pricing of long stay parking managed to incentivise greater use of transport options other than cars.

Occupancy of long-stay parking spaces between peak travel times measured at five locations within the CBD fringe.

A reducing trend.

A parking study was undertaken in 2014 that informed the development of the draft ‘Parking Strategy 2014-2024’.

Survey data collected in 2005, 2008 and 2012 shows there is an appropriate supply of parking. Forecasting indicates there is unlikely to be any significant increase in demand over the next ten years.

The engagement undertaken has indicated that the Nelson public consider the key parking issues to broadly be:

·      Enforcement – Since September 2013 parking enforcement has been undertaken by EIL. This has returned the level of enforcement to those prior to 2011. There is a perception this level of enforcement is too stringent and that enforcement should be more flexible.

·      Cost and payment options – Users of the parking in the CBD want payment options that provide more choice and flexibility.

·      There is a desire for more all day parking within the CBD together with an overall increase or redistribution of parking.

Subsequent to the draft parking strategy being prepared, Council, in response to the concerns of inner city retailers, resolved to remove the charge for parking for a winter trial period. As a result, finalisation of the strategy has been delayed until after this AMP has been completed. This AMP allows for the implementation of the actions detailed in the draft parking strategy but recognises that the direction and content of the parking strategy may change and some actions may not be necessary or other options may be trialled to ascertain their impact before the future direction is set.

Council resolved during the LTP deliberations to make the first hour of parking free to users and then increase the hourly rate to $1.50 for any time after.

4.6.1.   Implementation Package for Parking

·      Provide more payment choices at parking meters;

·      Manage the current parking supply to ensure the most sought-after parking spaces are available to be used by visitors to support the economic viability of the central CBD and Stoke;

·      Trial the allocation of car pool spaces in high demand, high visibility locations in the city centre. Promote the trial with existing and potential users;

·      Work with a CBD focus group to implement schemes to encourage visitors in the quiet winter months and focus on alternative transport modes to the private motor vehicle;

·      Improve the layout and access to Strawbridge Square carpark;

·      Secure a pedestrian corridor between Beach Road and Tahunanui Drive to enable better use of the Beach Road carparks;

·      Provide better information for drivers to find parking areas such as improved signage from the CBD ring route to the parking squares.

4.7.     Value for Money Principles

Value for money means a culture of continually seeking better and smarter services and ways of operating the transport activity. This is a concept that is high on the agenda in the Draft Government Policy Statement on land transport funding which seeks to make better use of the land transport network. Improved network management and selective development is needed to lift the performance and capacity of the existing network and minimise the need for major investment in new infrastructure.

The following implementation package will ensure value for money:

·      Road maintenance procedures will be used in a way that will optimise the amount of benefit gained from the money spent.

·      Investigation of collaboration and shared services with Marlborough District Council and Tasman District Council.

·      Improved asset management to ensure renewals are optimised.

The public will base much of the perception of value for money on how the Council delivers road improvements. The Council operates a road improvement policy which is aligned with value for money principles. This means improvements shall provide a high level of public amenity within the road that reinforces the importance and value of roads as public places. Upgraded roads would enhance personal security, facilitate slow vehicle speeds in residential areas and accommodate people that are less able or vulnerable, such as those with mobility and visual disabilities. The minimum standards in the Land Development Manual 2010 will reinforce the quality and therefore perceived value of the works.

Table 4.17     Level of Service Relating to Public Satisfaction

Level of Service

Performance Indicator

Performance Target

Public Satisfaction.

Percentage of public satisfied and dissatisfied with the transport activity (based on Nelson City Council Annual Residents Survey).

More than 50% of respondents are either very satisfied or satisfied, and less than 10% are either dissatisfied or very dissatisfied.

Figure 4.10   Percentage of Public Dissatisfied with the Transport Activity

A key driver for public satisfaction in terms of value for money is provision of good communication to explain issues to public. Key issues that the Council convey or intend to convey to the public include:

·      Importance of the arterials.

·      Parking policy and no-stopping lines.

·      Issues around local road speeds.

·      The success public transport improvements.

·      Council’s strategic direction.

·      Key safety issues for Nelson.

·      Congestion explanations.

·      Conflict on shared paths.

·      Structures on road reserve.

·      Resurfacing policy.

·      Traffic calming measures and techniques.

·      Explaining how council develops its minor improvements and footpath and road upgrade programme.

Much of this information is provided within the policies on the Council Website and is included in Live Nelson when the topic is in focus. It is important for the public to understand the rationale of the Council’s decisions and processes. It is hoped that with increased public understanding the value of Council transport activities and projects will be perceived to be positive.

Recent projects and studies have used the consultation section of the Nelson City Council website to communicate with residents. The Council’s transport staff also participate in as many forums as practical to answer questions raised by the public and providing explanations on transport issues. Talking this approach supports the value for money principles by engaging with the public and making sure the opinion of the public is heard.

It is important that the community knows the Council is listening and addressing their concerns, which the Council is committed to doing.

The Council also responds to requests from the public in a timely manner which is managed by the service request system which will help to elevate the satisfaction levels of the public.

4.8.     Systems to Measure, Monitor and Report on Performance Indicators

4.8.1.   Local Roads, Walking, Cycling and Schools

Much of the performance of the local roads is contained within the Council Road Asset Maintenance Management database. The road roughness and rating is gathered through surveys over the entire network every two years and reported on in the Infrastructure Annual Reports. The latest computer software running the Road Asset Maintenance Management database allows any Road Asset Maintenance Management information to display spatially on maps so any areas that may fall below the performance indicator levels can be identified.

The footpath network undergoes an audit every three years for the quality and safety of the network. This not only enables the performance to be measured but also maintenance work to be programmed. The results of the audits can be found in the Footway Audit Report.

The rate of walking and cycling can be measured in two ways. Firstly the census results which are freely available from Statistics New Zealand contain information on the mode of travel people chose to get to work; including by cycle or by foot. This information is gathered every five years. The second method is through the Annual Residents Survey as it contains questions in relation to the surveyed persons choice a travel mode. These results are published in the Council Survey of Residents report.

The regular cycle counts at key screen lines in the cycle network reveal the trends in cycling and provide some insight into whether the targets for increased cycle use are heading in the right direction.

4.8.2.   Arterial Traffic

The Council owns a TRACKS strategic transport model that was built in 2006 for the Nelson to Brightwater Study and updated in 2009 for the Arterial Traffic Study using 2006 census data. The validated model shows the Level of Service in terms of congestion and intersection delay. The Council intended to update the model in 2014 with the latest census data. However there was not enough change from the 2009 update to justify the expense. The Level of Service for the Waimea Road and SH6 Arterial routes can be checked and compared to the performance indicators and reported in the model reports.

The Waimea Road arterial route is of significant importance to the Council because it is not a state highway and therefore the sole responsibility of the Council. The Council assesses this route more frequently through monitoring travel times every quarter and volumes monthly.

From 2015 travel time surveys will be undertaken using wireless detection methods. This will provide a much larger sample than the current car following method.

4.8.3.   Safety

The statistics for accidents involving motorists, cyclists and pedestrians are a good indicator on how safely the transport network is operating. These statistics are gathered by the New Zealand Police and processed by the NZ Transport Agency using their Crash Accident Database. The accidents within the City of Nelson are extracted yearly so that the accident rates can be compared with the peer group average from around New Zealand. This also enables the progress of road safety to be monitored.

Additional cycle crash data is collected via the 0800 Cycle Crash hotline. This hotline is a joint initiative with TDC, NZ Transport Agency and ACC and designed to capture all of the crashes and near misses involving cyclists that do not typically make it into the NZ Transport Agency database.

The data is reported with internal annual road safety reports.

4.8.4.   Public Transport

Each quarter the key metrics of patronage and fare revenue by route, by zone and by ticket type are collated and reviewed to monitor the performance of the Public Transport system. At the end of each financial year the Council undertakes a financial analysis of the public transport service. This enables the revenue from the farebox to be compared to the operating cost of the public transport network.

These values are reported in the annual plan and therefore the performance of the public transport network can be monitored over time.

4.8.5.   Parking

The Council undertakes a midweek parking survey each year in December which measures the occupancy of the short stay parking spaces within the central core area. A survey of five sample areas in the fringe area is also surveyed in order to measure commuter parking demands. The peak occupancy is recorded and this can be compared to the performance target occupancy rate. The results are reported within the annual plan.

Every 4-5 years more comprehensive data is collected for the CBD and the fringe areas bordering the CBD. The surveys collect occupancy data for the whole area and duration of stay data for sample areas around the CBD. These surveys are undertaken on a Thursday and Saturday in the first week of December. The report summarising the last data collected can be found in A789874.

4.8.6.   Value for Money Principles

Every year the Council commissions a residents survey to seek feedback on their services and facilities as well as other information to assist them with planning, management and accountability.

The survey contains a specific section on the residents view on whether the Nelson City Council services and facilities are good value for money.

The results of the survey are published in the Council Survey of Residents report.


Transport

Asset Management Plan

2015 - 25

Part 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


N-logotype-black-wide

 

 


5.       Technical Performance measures/Asset management Systems/lifecycle

This section details the broad strategies and work programmes required to achieve the goals and standards outlined within section 4 of the Asset Management Plan.

It presents the lifecycle management plan for the transport assets, and includes:

·      A brief description of the assets;

·      Expenditure trends;

·      Key issues and strategies for managing these issues;

·      Operations, maintenance, and renewal and development strategies;

·      Financial forecasts.

The transport assets are split as follows:

·      Roads;

·      Road structures;

·      Pedestrian network;

·      Cycle network;

·      Passenger Transport Network;

·      Traffic control and equipment, street lighting, signs and markings;

·      Safety;

·      Parking;

·      Central Business District.

An overview of asset lifecycles is provided below which details the key stages in the asset lifecycle and asset failure. A brief description for the activities and projects outlined in the Level of Service section and this section is provided in Appendix K.

5.1.     Asset Lifecycle

Assets have a lifecycle as they move from initial concept to final disposal. Depending on the type of asset, its lifecycle varies from 1 year to over 100 years. Key stages in the asset lifecycle are described in Table 5.1.

Table 5.1       Key Stages in the Asset Lifecycle

Asset planning

The new asset is designed - decisions made at this time influence the cost of operating the asset and the lifespan of the asset. Other, non-asset solutions, must also be considered

Asset creation or acquisition

The asset is purchased - constructed or vested to Council. Capital cost, design and construction standards, commissioning the asset, and guarantees by suppliers influence the cost of operating the asset and the lifespan of the asset

Asset operations and maintenance

The asset is operated and maintained - operation relates to a number of elements including efficiency, power costs and throughput. Maintenance relates to preventative maintenance where minor work is carried out to prevent more expensive work in the future and reactive maintenance where a failure is fixed

Asset condition and performance monitoring

The asset is examined and checked to ascertain the remaining life of the asset - what corrective action is required including maintenance, rehabilitation or renewal and within what timescale

Asset rehabilitation and renewal

The asset is restored or replaced to ensure that the required level of service can continue to be delivered

Asset disposal and rationalisation

A failed or redundant asset is sold off, put to another use, or abandoned

5.2.     Asset Failure Modes

Generally it is assumed that physical failure is the critical failure mode for many assets. However the asset management process recognises that other modes are relevant and are often critical to effective delivery of services.

Table 5.2       Range of Asset Failure Modes

Structural

The physical condition of the asset is the measure of deterioration, service potential and remaining life

Capacity

The level of under or over capacity of the asset is measured against the required level of service to establish the remaining life

Level of Service Failure

Reliability of the asset or performance targets are not achieved

Obsolescence

Technical change or lack of replacement parts can render assets uneconomic to operate or maintain

Cost of Economic

Impact

The cost to maintain or operate an asset is greater than the economic return

Operator Error

The available skill level to operate an asset could impact on asset performance and service delivery

5.3.     Roads

The service level statement for roads is “Roads are safe to use and provide a comfortable and reliable means of travel.”

The last valuation of the roading network was undertaken in June 2014.

Table 5.3       Road Surface Valuation

 

June 2012

June 2014

Quantity

2,089,091 m2

2,140,850 m2

Replacement value

$ 24,992,982

26,649,423

Depreciated replacement value

$ 14,545,019

14,612,127

Annual depreciation

$ 1,051,059

1,113,452

Table 5.4       Road Basecourse Valuation

 

June 2012

June 2014

Quantity

2,295,969 m2

2,274,622 m2

Replacement value

$ 33,519,591

$ 33,429,410

Depreciated replacement value

$ 18,766,406

$ 15,777,764

Annual depreciation

$ 313,380

$ 364,686

The road network is managed in two ways. Firstly an ongoing maintenance programme addresses road defects through either planned or responsive maintenance and secondly roads are renewed or resealed based on a prioritised forward work programme (repairing those in the worst condition).


 

Expenditure Level (from 2012 to 2015)

·      Sealed pavement maintenance costs, approx $469,000/annum. (Reduction from 2009-12 of $94,000/annum.)

·      Sealed road resurfacing $1,600,000/annum. (Increase from 2009-12 of $650,000/annum.)

·      Sealed road pavement rehabilitation $0/annum. (Decrease from 2009-12 by $236,000/annum.)

·      Unsealed pavement maintenance costs, approx $34,000/annum.

·      Unsealed road metaling approx $65,000/annum.

·      Costs for general management and control of the road network and management of road asset, approx $481,000/annum.

·      Costs for other associated improvements and maintenance and renewals of drainage, approx $157,000/annum.

·      Depreciation approx $1,426,000/annum.

The Key Issues for Roads

·      The major focus of road maintenance is to prevent water getting into the road base.

·      Moisture will soften road base material. We must ensure use of correct surfacing materials in each road section to optimise the surface life.

·      The quality of road reinstatement work by utility operators.

·      Historically resurfacing has occurred without major dig outs to fix road base issues.

·      Increasing frequency of emergency events with the potential reduction in NZ Transport Agency co-investment for the recovery and re-instatement costs.

Strategies for Managing These Issues

·      Ensure both timely resurfacing and good drainage of the road surface so that it provides an adequate wearing and waterproofing course to prevent water getting into the road base.

·      Develop and adopt a surfacing selection guideline; regarding placement of asphalt or chipseal, including bus and cycle lanes with robust site validation processes through visual and experienced based road asset maintenance assessments.

·      An allowance of $200,000 per annum for the recovery of small scale emergency events has been allowed for under the environmental maintenance category.

 

·      In response to NZTA changing their initial advice on the way emergency events would be funded, the emergency works budget has been reduced to $100,000 per year cumulating.

5.3.1.   Asset Condition and Performance

Every formed Council owned road is recorded in the Road Asset Maintenance Management database. This database records pavement and surfacing construction, and maintenance history, inspection data and traffic volumes.

Road Asset Maintenance Management surveys are done every second year to assess the condition of the road pavement and surfacing. Assessments are carried out over a 50m stretch of every road. Long roads are split into sections. The pavement condition rating assesses rutting, cracking, potholes and shoving. The surfacing assessment considers flushing, bleeding, scabbing, ravelling and delaminating of chipseals, asphaltic concrete and slurry surfaces.

The road asset condition has been well documented in Section 4.2, 4.3 and 4.4. The average road roughness across the road hierarchy is below the level of service standard. The Surface Condition Index shows that the surface condition of roads has been improving since 2008.

There is a large section of road network that will exceed the expected life of the pavement over the next three years. There is also a significant length of the network that is older than the expected life which might be contributing to a higher Surface Condition Index than previously experienced.

Table 5.5       Road Surface Data Reliability Analysis

Data Attribute

Very Uncertain

Uncertain

Reliable

Highly reliable

Asset quantity

 

 

 

 

Asset age

 

 

 

 

Condition

 

 

 

 

Performance

 

 

 

 

Table 5.6       Road Base Data Reliability Analysis

Data Attribute

Very Uncertain

Uncertain

Reliable

Highly reliable

Asset quantity

 

 

 

 

Asset age

 

 

 

 

Condition

 

 

 

 

Performance

 

 

 

 

The Council regularly records traffic counts across the city. The counts are recorded monthly or annually depending on their location. The monthly counts consist of five sites on the arterial network. Count data is entered into the Road Asset Maintenance Management database to provide an overall picture of the network’s traffic use.

5.3.2.   Maintenance Strategy

The operation and maintenance of Council’s Transport infrastructure is managed by the Infrastructure Group. The roading maintenance contract was awarded to Downer EDI Works Ltd in 2010. The contract runs for 3 plus 1 + 1 + 1 years thus is due for renewal in 2016. The contract allows for the provision of all road maintenance and includes street and car park cleaning, road markings and signage.

All maintenance costs and traffic count data is recorded and inputted into the Road Asset Maintenance Management database monthly.

A three year forward works programme has been formulated, based on identified works contained within the Road Asset Maintenance Management, "all faults register" and is in the order of $500,000/year for pavement repairs, present repairs and maintenance. The budget is to cover these works and unidentified future failures. (Note: Any unidentified future failures will be prioritised against identified works contained within the all faults register, meaning not all identified works will be completed within the 3 year funding programme.) This is an increase of $31,000 over the 2012-15 level to make allowance for the likely increase in costs from the tender of a new maintenance contract.

The Council will formulate a resealing policy for urban roads. This policy will provide guidance on the type of seal to be used whether it is asphalt or road chip weighing up the whole of life costs of each type of seal.

5.3.3.   Pavement Rehabilitation

Where Road Asset Maintenance Management data and local observation indicates that poor pavement structure is critical then generally this is renewed as a standalone project. A review in 2014 (A1192250) highlighted the following priorities for the 2015-18 period:

·      Quarantine Road (SH6 to Nayland Road);

·      Maitai Valley Road (4500-4900);

·      Wildman Avenue Turning Head;

·      Cable Bay Road (1950-2900).

5.3.4.   New Roads

It is unlikely that any new roads will be built by the Council. New roads in Nelson will come from new subdivisions and the Council will adopt these roads after the subdivision developer has installed them.

5.3.5.   Reseals

Refer section 4.2.4.

5.4.     Road Structures

The service level statement for road structures including bridges and retaining walls is “road structures are considered to be designed and maintained to provide safe access across the network”.

The last valuation of the roading network was undertaken in June 2014.

Table 5.7       Bridges Valuation

 

June 2012

June 2014

Quantity

 44

44

Replacement value

$ 26,414,919

$27,199,741

Depreciated replacement value

$ 17,241,787

$ 17,649,524

Annual depreciation

$ 280,607

$ 288,947

Table 5.8       Retaining Wall Valuation

 

June 2012

June 2014

Quantity

28,111 m2

30,852 m2

Replacement value

$ 44,850,330

$ 51,422,169

Depreciated replacement value

$ 29,735,112

$ 37,426,908

Annual depreciation

$ 658,467

$616,972

Structures on the road network are generally managed by undertaking regular inspections to identify a forward maintenance programme to address defects. New structures are also built to cater for growth. These are generally built by developers as part of new subdivisions.

Structures are classified as a roading asset where they provide support for roads.

 

Expenditure Trends (from 2012-2015)

·      Preventative retaining wall maintenance costs, approx $64,000.

·      Maintenance on structures approx $72,000/annum.

·      Depreciation approx $770,000/annum.

The Key Issues for Structures

·      Ownership of retaining walls.

·      Structures approaching the end of useful life.

·      Premature failure.

·      Seismic capacity for all but lifeline routes not well understood.

Strategies for Managing These Issues

·      Develop ownership guidelines and investigate as part of retaining wall condition survey (found assets).

·      Continually keep track of structure condition and maintain as required. Replacing or retrofitting structures as useful life diminishes.

5.4.1.   Asset Condition and Performance

The condition of both bridges and retaining walls is recorded in detailed inspection surveys every six years. Every two years those structures that are in poor condition or at risk then put on a two year inspection cycle.

The surveys were last surveyed in 2007 by Tonkin and Taylor. The survey rates each wall- and bridges general condition on a scale from 1-5 with 1 being of good general condition and 5 being of poor general condition. A risk assessment of the likelihood of failure and the expected life expectancy are also estimated. The last survey was undertaken by Tonkin and Taylor in 2007.

The average assessed remaining total asset life of the roading retaining walls is 39 years and those walls on cycleways/walkways is 34 years. Eight walls were identified in the survey as requiring replacement. The spread of remaining asset life for walls is shown in Figure 5.1.

Figure 5.1     Remaining Asset Life of Retaining Walls

The detailed survey of bridges are undertaken approximately every 6 years and was last undertaken over the 2010/2011 summer period by Aurecon. The survey report details specific defects found during the survey. It also provides a recommendation for maintenance work and a forward work priority programme. A seismic review was undertaken on six key structures which were identified in the previous report as likely to suffer significant damage in the event of a magnitude 7.5 earthquake. The details of the conditions recorded in the survey are contained in a Road Asset Maintenance Management database held with the Council.

The key structures have a remaining design life of between 25 and 61 years and four of the seven bridges were identified as requiring earthquake strengthening. It was found that 22 bridge structures required maintenance work valued at greater than $5,000.

Table 5.9       Road Structure Data Reliability Analysis

Data Attribute

Very Uncertain

Uncertain

Reliable

Highly reliable

Asset quantity

 

 

 

 

Asset age

 

 

 

 

Condition

 

 

 

 

Performance

 

 

 

 

5.4.2.   Maintenance Strategy

Repairs and maintenance of structures are identified through the survey inspection reports as detailed in Section 5.4.1 or routine inspections undertaken by the Contractor or Councils contract supervisors. Maintenance is therefore mostly reactionary to defects identified in surveys rather than preventative maintenance.

The current road maintenance contract (to September 2013, with an optional extension for a further 3 years) specifies the response times for different repair types, the roles of the Engineer and Contractor, performance requirements and the basis of payment.

5.4.3.   Renewal Strategy

Renewal of road structure assets will be implemented to maintain a level of service of an asset by intervening prior to either the end of the useful life of the asset, or the condition of the asset falling below an agreed level.

The renewals programme is developed using the recommendations of the bridge and retaining wall survey reports.

5.4.4.   New Structures/Capital Works

It is proposed that seismic strengthening of bridges on lifeline transport routes be funded to provide greater resilience in the event of emergencies. The high risk bridges proposed to be addressed in the next three years are:

Gibbs and Poleford Bridge - seismic strengthening, Security of these lifeline bridges to ensure access to city water supply pipeline up the Maitai Valley in case of earthquake, design and construction in one year under the Minor Improvement work category.

New structures will only be undertaken where new roads are required. New roads are most likely to be associated with new development so it will be expected that any structures required will be installed by the developer prior to the council adopting the roads and structures.

5.4.5.   Emergency Works

Structures are susceptible to damage during natural disasters, in particular flooding and earthquakes. The recent storm events in the Nelson region highlighted the risk that exists for the area. Failure of or damage to a bridge or retaining wall during one of these events would result in emergency works to initially make the asset useable and also to secure the long term future for the asset.

The Council can obtain emergency works funding and insurance for events. The Financial Assistance Rate rates for funding of emergency works has not been announced yet but Council will still need to provide partial emergency works funding. The Financial Assistance Rate funding is not always covered for replacement of damaged retaining walls, even if they are a Council asset. Only if the walls are supporting the road is there an opportunity to seek funding.

5.5.     Pedestrian Network

The service level statement for footpaths is “the footpaths network is considered to be suitable, accessible, safe and well maintained”.

The last valuation of the roading network was undertaken in June 2014.

Table 5.10     Footpaths Valuation

 

June 2012

June 2014

Quantity

494,845 m2

481,443 m2

Replacement value

$ 28,324,783

$ 30,043,243

Depreciated replacement value

$ 8,742,590

$ 9,406,454

Annual depreciation

$ 273,298

$ 337,466

Table 5.11     Walkways Valuation

 

June 2012

June 2014

Quantity

23,067 m2

23,067 m2

Replacement value

$ 3,669,888

$ 3,806,273

Depreciated replacement value

$ 2,619,867

$ 2,627,768

Annual depreciation

$ 38,129

$ 40,104

The footpath network is managed in three ways. Firstly an ongoing maintenance programme addresses footpath defects through either planned or responsive maintenance. Secondly footpaths are renewed based on a prioritised forward work programme (repairing those in the worst condition), and thirdly, new footpaths are built because of health and safety issues, accessibility requirements, or in response to public requests meeting certain engineering, environmental and community criteria. These new footpaths are service level improvements and not growth related. New footpaths are also built to cater for growth. These are generally built by developers as part of new subdivisions.

Walkways are classified as a roading asset where they connect roads, are on legal road and serve for the purpose of providing a route for pedestrians/cyclists with limited recreational value. There is a register of these which has been agreed with Parks and Community Facilities.


 

Expenditure Level (from 2012 to 2015)

·      Maintenance costs, approx $206,000/annum.

·      Renewals budget $550,000/annum.

·      Capital costs for new footpaths to improve the level of service vary from $150,000 to $1,000,000/annum depending on scheduled roading projects.

·      New/upgrade walkways $100,000/annum.

·      Capital cost for new walkways to improve the level of service $100,000/annum

·      Depreciation approx $280,000/annum.

The Key Issues for Footpaths

·      Demand for footpaths and walkways where previous development has occurred below the current standards.

·      Conflict at crossings between providing a smooth level surface for mobility scooters and a suitable vehicular access.

·      Demand for new and improved footpaths and walkways due to ageing population.

·      Demand for improved lighting of footpaths and walkways.

·      Demand for improved connectivity between footpaths, and safer road crossings, especially around schools and across the busy arterials.

·      The high cost of providing new footpaths on hillside and rural streets, and the compromises that are made should a lower standard be proposed (usually at the detriment of on-street parking, slower vehicle speeds and the perception of pedestrian safety.

·      Improvement in quality of footpath between the Central Business District and Tahunanui Beach.

5.5.1.   Asset Condition and Performance

Road Asset Maintenance Management records footpath and walkway condition assessments. The Council undertakes regular footpath condition assessments which inform the footpath renewal forward work programme. The most recent footpath condition assessment has been undertaken by L&M Price for the entire city in 2014. A summary of the data collected in this assessment is contained in Table 4.3 in section 4.2.1.

Table 5.12     Footway Data Reliability Analysis

Data Attribute

Very Certain

Uncertain

Reliable

Highly reliable

Asset quantity

 

 

 

 

Asset age

 

 

 

 

Condition

 

 

 

 

Performance

 

 

 

 

Pedestrian counts are undertaken every 6 months in 5 locations throughout the city and comparisons can be made with the 5 year comprehensive survey undertaken in 2010. Reporting of the pedestrian surveys is provided in the Regional Land Transport Programme and Regional Land Transport Strategy Annual report.

5.5.2.   Maintenance Strategy

Footpath and walkway repairs are identified through customer notification or routine inspections undertaken by the Contractor or Councils contract supervisors.

The current road maintenance contract (to September 2013, with an optional extension for a further 2 years) specifies the response times for different repair types, the roles of the Engineer and Contractor, performance requirements and the basis of payment.

Considerations which drive the maintenance works include:

·      Planned and unplanned work depending upon the urgency of the response required.

·      Footpath and kerb replacement required as a result of street tree roots.

5.5.3.   Renewal Strategy

The function of the renewal budget is to maintain a level of service of an asset by intervening prior to either the end of the useful life of the asset, or the condition of the asset falling below an agreed level.

The main driver for a renewals programme is Council’s responsibility, as the custodian of the footpath network to effectively maintain and manage the lifecycle of the network, on behalf of the ratepayers who own it, for the least cost over the useful life of that network. The renewals programme shown in Appendix N has been developed by network services staff using the criteria outlined below:

·      Road Asset Maintenance Management and area wide survey condition ratings - including an assessment of safety and risk-of-failure, in other words, a footpath condition-rating scale.

·      Use and location - Areas of high pedestrian use (for example main bus routes, commercial centres), and those with a high public profile will be one criterion for priority upgrade. Areas that fall into this category comprise commercial centres (including the Central Business District); areas around schools; major walkways and cycleways for example.

·      Under-grounding or other utility works - The ability to coordinate footpath upgrade works with under-grounding or other utility projects offers significant advantages. Mapping of forward programmes may result in advantages for cost and programming e.g. these include main street programmes, road renewals, large events such as Central Business District upgrades and other utilities work programmes.

·      Optimisation – alignment with other roading works to minimise inconvenience to the public (whole of street approach).

All renewal works aim to comply with the Land Development Manual 2010 footpath standards, although in some instances, such as hill side streets, or where crossings are steep, this is not always possible. Staff endeavour at all times to implement the objectives of the Land Development Manual when renewing footpaths.

The footpath renewals contract is included in the road maintenance contract.

5.5.4.   New Footpaths and Walkways

Since 2012, Council has taken a new direction on the planning of future new footpaths and signs and changing the focus to slowing traffic speeds and making the local roads safer for all users especially in the hillside areas where it is very costly to provide footpaths.

New footpaths and walkways will be constructed from a priority list of missing footpaths with an annual budget of $200,000. The new footpath schedule can be found in Appendix M with the live priority matrix in document A777631.

5.6.     Cycle Network

The service level statement for the cycle network is “the cycle network is considered to be suitable, accessible, safe and well maintained”.

There are approximately 20 kilometre of off-road cycleways and 34 kilometres of on-road cycleways. Part of this network is integrated with footpaths and carriageways.

‘Cycle lanes’ is the term used to describe dedicated routes on roads. Shared walk/cycleways describe off road routes separated from road traffic by either a kerb or verge, either on road reserve or other Council or NZ Transport Agency owned land that is identified as a shared utility in the Parking and Vehicle Control Bylaw schedules. Generally shared walk/cycle paths are 3 metres wide. Off-road cycleways are generally defined as those outside of the road reserve and are addressed in the Parks and Reserves Asset Management Plan.

The last valuation of the roading network was undertaken in June 2014.

Table 5.13     Cycleways Valuation

 

June 2012

June 2014

Quantity

65,707 m2

71,192 m2

Replacement value

$ 3,735,966

$ 4,682,764

Depreciated replacement value

$ 3,371,443

$ 4,000,467

Annual depreciation

$ 46,296

$ 71,973

The cycleway network is managed in a similar way as the pedestrian network, identified in 5.5 above.

Expenditure Level (from 2012 to 2015)

·      Maintenance costs approx $65,000/annum since the completion of the Atawhai cycleway.

·      Budgeted capital costs for new cycleways to improve the level of service vary with significant expenditure over the last three years implementing the walk cycle schools package of works. This package has received NZ Transport Agency co-investment from Regional Funds.

·      The key issues for shared walk/cycle paths and on road cycle lanes are:

·      Demand to extend and improve cycle linkages (the current network with planned improvements is shown in Figure 5.2 below.

·      Conflict at crossings between cyclists and vehicles and on shared paths between cyclists, pedestrians and dogs.

·      Demand for new and wider shared paths and cycleways.

·      Demand for improved lighting and markings on shared paths and cycleways.

·      Broken glass on the shared paths and cycle lanes.

·      Removal of cycle facilities during roadworks.


 

Figure 5.2     Existing and Proposed Cycle Network


 

5.6.1.   Asset Condition and Performance

Road Asset Maintenance Management records shared walk cycleways, although as all the paths are relatively young (less than 13 years) there has been no condition assessments carried out to date. Over the last couple of years it is evident that some older cycleways require some renewal, specifically the coastal route and the airport bridge. The condition of the on road cycle lanes is managed with the carriageway infrastructure and line markings and are considered in section 4.2.3.

Table 5.14     Cycle Infrastructure Data Reliability Analysis

Data Attribute

Very Uncertain

Uncertain

Reliable

Highly reliable

Asset quantity

 

 

 

 

Asset age

 

 

 

 

Condition

 

 

 

 

Performance

 

 

 

 

Cycle counts are undertaken every 6 months in 5 locations throughout the city and comparisons can be made with the 5 year comprehensive survey undertaken in 2010. Reporting on the cycle surveys are provided in the Regional Land Transport Plan (RLTP) and RLTP Annual Report.

5.6.2.   Maintenance Strategy

Cycle path repairs and glass removal are identified through customer notification or routine inspections undertaken by the Contractor or Councils contract supervisors.

Cycleways routine maintenance provides for the normal care and attention of the asset to maintain its integrity and to be fit for purpose. It is a combination of planned maintenance such as sweeping and reactive maintenance such as patching and repairing cycleways when complaints by the public are received.

The current road maintenance contract (to September 2013, with an optional extension for a further three years) specifies the response times for different repair types.

Considerations which drive the maintenance works include:

·      Planned and unplanned work depending upon the urgency of the response required.

·      Scheduled improvements planned works.

Cycle network maintenance costs have historically been $65,000/annum (maintenance - $35k, sweeping - $15k and Atawhai shared path $15k). However the network has just been extended significantly by the R funding walk, cycle schoolpackage (6.1km shared path) in the 2012-15 period with a corresponding increase in maintenance required. Cycle network maintenance of $80,000 is now necessary to maintain the level of service.

5.6.3.   Renewal Strategy

Renewal expenditure is major work, which does not increase the assets’ design capacity but restores, rehabilitates, replaces or renews an existing asset to its original capacity. Cycleways renewal is undertaken when all or part of a cycleway has reached the end of its economic life. The required level of replacement/rehabilitation will depend on age, condition, the level of ongoing maintenance and useful lives of the materials used.

Renewals of the following are programmed in the next three years:

·      Airport Bridge;

·      1.65km of the coastal path.

5.6.4.   New Shared Walk / Cycleways and Cycle Lanes

A package of walking and cycling projects ‘R’ is included. An overview of these projects is identified in the Regional Land Transport Plan and further detail is provided in Appendix K under the walk/cycle package.

5.7.     Public Transport

Nelson currently operates two public transport services. They include;

The NBus including The Late Late Bus[3] (subsidised by Council and NZ Transport Agency);

The Total Mobility scheme – door to door passenger service for the mobility impaired (subsidised by Council and NZ Transport Agency).

The Council also offers a Super Gold Card scheme for pensioners where they get to travel for free during off peak periods on the NBus. This scheme is fully funded by central government.

Figure 5.3     Zone Structure and Bus Routes

Transport Map Only.jpg

Contract Structure

The contract for the NBus and the Late Late Bus services was awarded in March 2012 to SBL Limited. The contract was for 6 years with two two-year extensions if performance indicators are met. In May 2013, the contract changed from a gross contract price to a net contract with all fare revenue retained by the operator. The net contract sum is $535,000 in 2013/14 and is adjusted for inflation each year. The current contract also allows for the contract price to be renegotiated if changes in service levels are required.


Key Issues for Public Transport

·      Accessibility to local services / facilities / places of employment;

·      Frequency of bus services, particularly between Nelson and Richmond;

·      Equitable funding from various sources (fares, rates parking revenue, NZ Transport Agency, Tasman District Council).

·      Ageing population resulting in increasing demand for the total mobility service.

Financial

In addition to funding from ratepayers and the NZ Transport Agency, a proportion of the costs are contributed by the user through fares. In 2012/13 63% of the cost of the NBus and Late Late Bus services was recovered through fares. The usual funding arrangement for public transport in New Zealand is that the net cost is funded in equal proportions by the local council(s) and the NZ Transport Agency. However when the improved NBus service was introduced in 2012, the NZ Transport Agency indicated that it would not be able to increase its co investment and the funding gap was met using a portion of Council’s parking revenue. Now that the service has proven itself, the NZ Transport Agency has confirmed indicated that Nelson is in a strong position to get matched co investment in the 2015-18 NLTP. The NZ Transport Agencies preference would be for this increase to fund a significant improvement to the service, so that Council’s contribution remains the same. This 2015-25 AMP has no contribution from the parking account to public transport with the local share now being fully funded from rates.

Table 5.15     Fares as at July 2014

5.7.1.   Improvement Strategy

The following priorities for public transport have been identified in the 2013 review of the NBus service[4] in order to increase patronage:

·      Lower fares to increase patronage and then review fare structure every two years.

·      Increase the frequency of the bus service on arterial routes between Nelson and Richmond and to encourage an increase in patronage.

·      Continue marketing and promotion of new, improved, or altered services.

·      Review the provision of bus stops and shelters and prioritise infrastructure improvements.

·      Conduct user and non-user surveys every 2 years and use feedback to improve services.

·      Construct additional infrastructure on hail and ride rates to increase visibility of service.

·      Improve coverage of bus service in Stoke.

In 2014 Council carried out a business case assessment in order to obtain additional funding from NZ Transport Agency to implement the improved coverage in Stoke and to inform the Regional Public Transport Plan. The outcomes of the business case will be determined by NZ Transport Agency during the RLTP moderation process.  The Business Case successfully obtained co-investment from NZ Transport Agency for increased bus coverage in Stoke.

The following priorities for total mobility have been identified:

·      Increase funding at 6% per annum for the 2015-2025 period to meet the demand caused by the ageing population for the service.

5.7.2.   Future Public Transport Study

A public transport review is planned to occur every five years with the next review scheduled in 2019/20.

The full scope of the review is yet to be established but it is likely this will entail assessing the suitability of the public transport network and whether changes should be made to bus routes and if new routes are required.

5.8.     Traffic Control and Equipment, Street Lighting, Signs and Markings

The service level statement for the transport assets in this section are:

·      Traffic signals are designed and maintained to optimise traffic flow in the roading network.

·      Street lighting is provided and maintained to enable safe and easy night driving on all urban streets and to outdoor public spaces were night time pedestrians movements dominate e.g. Central Business District areas.

·      Appropriate signage is maintained to enable safe and efficient way finding across the transport network.

·      Road markings are maintained to provide clear delineation and direction for roads, parking, and cycle and bus lanes at all times.

The last valuation of the roading network was undertaken in June 2014.

Table 5.16     Street Signs Valuation

 

June 2012

June 2014

Quantity

 2,882

2,882

Replacement value

$ 1,590,864

$ 1,809,896

Depreciated replacement value

$ 795,432

$ 904,948

Annual depreciation

$ 106,058

$ 120,660

 


 

Table 5.17     Line Marking Valuation

 

June 2012

June 2014

Quantity

 

 

Replacement value

$ 120,000

$ 120,000

Depreciated replacement value

$ 120,000

$ 120,000

Annual depreciation

$120,000

$120,000

Table 5.18     Streetlights Valuation

 

June 2012

June 2014

Quantity

4,291

4,433

Replacement value

$ 20,237,614

$ 34,648,552

Depreciated replacement value

$ 10,685,803

$ 17,226,538

Annual depreciation

$ 556,932

$ 796,011

Table 5.19     Traffic Signals Valuation

 

June 2012

June 2014

Quantity

12

13

Replacement value

$ 1,858,069

$ 3,513,748

Depreciated replacement value

$ 821,884

$ 1,959,584

Annual depreciation

$91,115

$ 139,368

These roading assets are an important activity for the Council to manage as they provide important information and direction to all road users. The Council seeks to ensure that this is done so that the transport network is safe, legible and efficient.

Expenditure Trends (from 2012 to 2015)

·      Maintenance costs of signs, markings and street lighting and furniture, approx $930,000/annum.

·      Renewal costs of signs, markings, street lighting and furniture and traffic signals, approx $130,000/annum.

·      Operation and maintenance of traffic signals, approx $78,000/annum.

·      Depreciation approx $930,000/annum.

The Key Issues

·      Lack of road sign asset knowledge.

·      Street lighting poles that are in a poor condition and luminaries that have reached the end of their serviceable life.

Strategies for Managing These Issues

·      Develop inventory for street signs.

·      Use pole testing results to target replacement of at risk poles.

·      Replace poor performing luminaries with LED’s.

5.8.1.   Asset Condition and Performance

The Council requires a sign inventory to be undertaken so that the location and condition of all signs and supports are recorded into Road Asset Maintenance Management. It is estimated that this will cost $50,000.

The traffic signal asset is in a very good condition with recent controller and LED upgrades.

Sign condition is monitored by the road maintenance contractor and signs that fall below standard are programmed to be replaced.

There are still a considerable number of Mercury Vapour/Fluorescent lights all over the city. These should be replaced wherever possible with LED technology to improve light output and reduce energy consumption. Lighting poles are in the process of being inspected for structural integrity. Refer to document A1224555

5.8.2.   Renewal Strategy

There are no planned renewals for the traffic signal asset in the first three years.

The streetlight renewal budget of $200,000/annum will be used to improve street lighting, focussing on:

·      Safety of all users;

·      Renewal of aged mercury vapour and fluorescent luminaries;

·      Improving the energy efficiency of the streetlight network by installing LED’s;

·      Replacing rusty pole bases;

·      Reducing light pollution with the Dark Sky policy.

The Council has a “Dark Sky” policy when it comes to new or improved street lighting. This policy has been adopted to limit the amount of light pollution emitted directly up from street lights.

5.8.3.   New Assets

There are no new traffic signals planned in the next five years.

Along with street lighting renewal to improve lighting levels there will be new street lighting also incorporated into the following upgrade projects.

·      Rocks Road walking and cycling;

·      Milton, and Halifax upgrades.

5.9.     Safety

The service level statement for safety is:

“To work towards a safe road system increasingly free of death and serious injury.”

The following objectives relate to the NZ Transport Agency work category (432) on road safety in particular promotion, education and advertising. This work category provides for the development and implementation of activities that address the safe use of the land transport network.


 

Objectives

·      Advancing the priorities and initiatives identified in the Safer Journeys Strategy and its action plan (www.saferjourneys.govt.nz).

·      Achieving safer outcomes by working with communities to identify and deliver local land transport safety issues.

·      Developing and motivating national, regional and local land transport safety partnerships to ensure an integrated approach to safety outcomes.

Strategic Fit To the Nelson Region

The 2014 NZ Transport Agency Communities at Risk Register;

·      shows Nelson City to have low individual risk for cyclists;

·      shows older drivers in Nelson are at below average individual risk for a crash;

·      shows Nelson to have medium individual risk for pedestrians;

·      shows young drivers to be at low individual risk in Nelson City but are a high priority nationally;

·      Safer Speeds is also identified as a high priority in the Safer Journeys strategy.

Current Road Safety Performance

The analysis in Section 4.4 indicates that road safety has improved markedly from the period covered by the previous AMP. The target for road safety performance has been changed to move away from statistics that compare Nelson with the peer group average and instead towards a fixed baseline. This will allow a direct measure of the improvement in Nelson alone without a particularly good or bad year in the other centres influencing whether the targets have been met locally.

In order to achieve the gains in road safety that have been realised in the last three to five years the Council has run a variety of initiatives and campaigns that are summarised by transport mode below. In the 2012-2015 period $147,000 per annum was budgeted.

Cycling

The initiatives for improving cycle safety are Nelson’s RIDE ON Strategy, 0800 CYCLECRASH and Be Bright on a Bike. Key outcomes are to improve community cycle skills, encourage more cycle use, drawing attention to cycle presence on the road and a reduction in crashes involving cyclists.

Motorcycling

The initiative for improving motorcycle safety is the “Top of the South Motorcycle Safety Programme. Key parts to the strategy are motorcycle training courses together with information publicised on licence requirements and safety gear as two closest neighbours Tasman and Marlborough District Council have medium casualty risk rating for motorcycles.

Older Drivers

The initiatives for improving safety with Nelson’s older drivers are the Staying Safe, Car Fit and Mobility Scooter Training schemes. Key parts to achieve this are classroom based learning on staying safe and one to one mobility scooter training and support. A Car Fit package helps older drivers recognise what their vehicle’s safety features are and assists in correctly adjusting them to their personal needs.


 

Speeds and Driving to the Conditions

The initiatives for reducing driver speeds will focus on driver education and awareness in particular to driving within residential streets. It is hoped that a greater ownership of streets and public space by residents can be achieved by investigation and implementation of a community development model to reduce speeds in residential streets.

Walking

The initiatives for improving safety while walking focuses on young pedestrians and parents of child pedestrians. The work will involve walking school buses and Feet First and Walk to School promotions. Other events and activities designed to promote and encourage using active transport as a mode of travel to and from school will be utilised.

Younger Drivers

The initiatives for improving safety amongst young drivers are Rotary Young Driver Awareness (RYDA), Students Against Dangerous Driving (SADD) and the training of teachers in delivering road safety across the school curriculum. Key outcomes are to provide increased awareness in the target group of young drivers and their parents about elevated risk levels and steps that can be taken to reduce that risk.

Road Safety Action Plan

The Council has a joint road safety action plan with the Tasman District Council. This plan is a critical component in the delivery of a Road Safety programme across the Nelson/Tasman district. The two councils through resolution have agreed to a cluster arrangement for the purpose of delivering a road safety programme across their respective districts. For management purposes a Joint Road Safety Action Plan Committee has been appointed with representatives from key stakeholder groups.

The Road Safety Action Plan Committee is tasked with the management of all road safety activities. To enable this, a supporting structure has been developed which includes:

·      Three times a year council led and chaired Road Safety Action meetings, which include formal agendas and stakeholder reporting lines and minutes.

·      Operational meetings for professional key staff as and when required with meeting recordings made.

·      Planning processes and operational calendars and works schedules as attached.

The goal of the plan is to contribute to the Governments Safer Journey initiatives which aim to reduce road user crash risks and consequences. The plan acknowledges the Governments Safer Journeys initiatives and that even a responsible driver may make mistakes on our local roads. It is the goal of this plan to better manage our road networks, our vehicles, our users and crash forces to deliver a safe system across the Nelson/Tasman sub region.

To achieve the goals of the plan the Road Safety Action Plan aims to:

·      Fully understand crash risk on our road networks.

·      Redesign our high risk road infrastructures to be predictable, forgiving of mistakes and self explaining.

·      Manage our local roads to ensure that the travel speeds suit the function and safety level for the road environment and conditions.

·      Manage local vehicles to ensure they are safe and road worthy.

·      Ensure that all road users are skilled, competent, alert, unimpaired, comply with the road rules and take steps to improve their safety.

The improvements in road safety that have resulted in all of Nelson previously medium to high risk user groups dropping to low risk on the High Risk Communities Register have been as a result, in part to the programmes and initiatives detailed above. In order to maintain this safety improvement and make further gains Council needs to continue to be proactive with road safety campaigns and initiatives that include speed reduction measures.

5.10.   Parking

The service level statement for parking is “Parking is easy to use, and is rationed fairly and equitably”.

The last valuation of the roading network was undertaken in June 2014.

Table 5.20     Car Parking Valuation

 

June 2012

June 2014

Quantity

36,207m2

33,892 m2

Replacement value

$ 2,600,849

$ 2,777,088

Depreciated replacement value

$ 831,756

$ 660,919

Annual depreciation

$ 32,985

$ 32,280

Council has eight car parks, two in Stoke (237 parks) and six in the Central Business District (871 parks). The number of spaces in each park is identified in Table 5.25.

Table 5.21     Car Parking Spaces in Nelson and Stoke

ID

Location

Number of spaces

Parking Type

1

Strawbridge Square (Stoke)

180

time restricted

2

Putaitai Street/Fire Station Car Park (Stoke)

57

time restricted

3

Tahaki Street (Nelson Library)

59

time restricted

4

Millers Acre

92

metered

5

Wakatu Square

173

metered

6

Buxton Square

229

metered

7

Montgomery Square

268

metered

8

Betts Car Park

52

leased to individual users

9

Bridge Street Car Park

 

leased to individual users

 

Total

1108

 

 


 

Table 5.22     Car Parking Data Reliability Analysis

Data Attribute

Very Uncertain

Uncertain

Reliable

Highly reliable

Asset quantity

 

 

 

 

Asset age

 

 

 

 

Condition

 

 

 

 

Performance

 

 

 

 

Parking and public transport are intrinsically linked. Changes to the parking charge may affect the use of public transport. Free parking would discourage use of public transport, requiring increased enforcement or increases in the commercial rate to ensure funds were available to operate, maintain and improve the Central Business District.

In Nelson there is a lack of long term parking spaces within the Central Business District and the Council does not plan to add any more long term parking capacity. Along with parking charge rates the Council wish to maintain a central city parking regime that is incentivised for people to use public transport and active modes.

Expenditure Trends (from 2012 to 2015)

·      Carpark maintenance costs approx $266,000/annum;

·      Carpark lease costs $167,600/annum;

·      Carpark rate costs $324,000/annum.

The Key Issues for Car Parking

·      Maximum Parking occupancy exceeding the desired level of service at 85% in the surveyed first week of December in the Central Business District core.

·      Perception of heavy handed enforcement.

·      Long-stay commuters occupy a significant proportion of the short stay inner city parking.

·      Condition monitoring and rating, maintenance and replacement of signage and marking affect the effectiveness of parking restriction enforcement.

·      Frequent requests for no-stopping lines.

·      Payment methods out of date with current technologies.

Strategies for Managing These Issues

·      Optimise time limits to reflect car parking demand.

·      Replace parking meters in 2017/18 with a more flexible payment facility.

·      Trial different parking regimes in order to determine best fit for the Nelson CBD users.

·     

5.10.1. Asset Condition and Performance

Off-street car parks have been incorporated and included into the Road Asset Maintenance Management database.

Car parking meters were renewed in 2006 to ensure compliance with the new currency and will be coming to their end of life in 2017/18. The maintenance costs for the meters have not increased significantly as their end of life has approached however the need to introduce more convenient ways to pay such using credit and debit cards including Pay Wave will drive the replacement date.


 

Summary of 2008 and 2012 Car Parking Data Collection Reports

·      815 parks are available in the four Central Business District squares – approximately 25% used by all day commuters;

·      There is enough short-stay capacity if the long-stayers stopped using the short stay spaces;

·      Short stay parking should be of sufficient capacity, carefully costed, well-located and accessible;

·      Long Stay parking should not compete with short stay capacity, and should align with the wider transport policy.

Potential Methods to Manage Parking Square Enforcement

·      Continue existing pay and display system (note: tickets can only be issued if money is paid);

·      Install barrier arms and new meters (cost estimate $300,000 per square) for a “pay as you exit system”;

·      Change bylaw to more clearly limit the length of time allowed in a parking square per day.

Parking Revenue

·      In 2012/13 $428k was received from on-street meters and $712k from off-street meters. It ahs been estimated that under the current one hour free then $1.50/hr that the total revenue from the meters will be in the order of $460K pa.

·      Infringement recoveries ($838k received in 2012/13) fund parking regulation enforcement.

Implementation Plan for Parking

·      Renew pay and display meters with units that enable payment by credit card and integration with smart phone apps to extend the stay, $470,000 in 2017/18 and $470,000 in 2018/19.

·      Install signage directing users to the parking squares from the CBD ring route, $200,000 in 2015/16 and $100,000 in 2016/17.

·      Reconfigure the traffic signals on Main Road Stoke at the Putaitai intersection to allow the right turn out to prevent unnecessary movements through Strawbridge Square carpark, $40,000 in 2015/16.

·      Modify the tree planters in Strawbridge Square carpark to minimse damage, $30,000 in 2015/16.

·      Allocate a small number of campervan and motor home spaces within the CBD, $20,000 in 2016/17.

 


6.       Valuation

Roading Asset Valuation

 

 

 

 

Asset Category

June 2014

Quantity

Units

RV ($)

DRV ($)

Depr ($)

Pavement Layers

Formation

2,943,138

m3

105,952,978

105,952,978

 

Sub-base

385,000

m3

40,810,048

40,810,048

 

Basecourse

2,274,622

m2

33,429,410

15,777,764

364,686

Surfacing

2,140,850

m2

26,649,423

14,612,127

1,113,452

Drainage

Intakes

57

units

287,215

213,791

3,590

Outfalls

37

units

141,229

91,719

2,026

Sumps

6,185

units

14,445,169

9,548,638

160,449

Stormwater pipes

74,456

m

31,254,587

18,344,137

365,090

Culverts

3,578

m

3,070,782

1,492,914

34,714

Kerb and Channel

339,426

m

21,527,541

10,991,856

282,476

Kerb Only

13,480

m

899,166

569,484

12,920

Dished Channels

26,751

m

2,360,180

334,096

40,377

Regulatory

Signs

2,882

units

1,809,896

904,948

120,660

Electronic Signs

30

units

262,920

237,018

21,910

Posts

1,758

units

153,913

76,956

10,261

Handrails/Sight Rails

6,443

m

836,134

418,067

27,871

Guardrails

1,219

m

915,311

457,655

18,306

Edge Marker Posts

441

units

9,993

4,997

1,999

Speed Tables

36

units

936,000

633,100

23,400

Road Humps

20

units

29,640

14,820

1,186

Raised Pavement Markers

1,531

units

26,808

13,404

2,234

Road Markings

 

 

120,000

120,000

 

Traffic Signals

 

 

3,513,748

1,959,584

139,368

Streetlights

Streetlights

4,433

units

34,648,552

17,226,538

796,011

Structures

Bridges

44

units

27,199,741

17,649,524

288,947

Retaining Walls

30,852

m2

51,422,169

37,426,908

616,972

Fords

3

units

84,781

57,798

848

Footbridges

28

units

1,250,597

862,480

12,506

Other

Land for Legal Road

 

 

256,096,995

256,096,995

 

Footpaths

481,443

m2

30,043,243

9,406,454

337,466

Walkways

23,067

m2

3,806,273

2,627,768

40,104

Cycleways

71,192

m2

4,682,764

4,000,467

71,973

Carparks

33,892

m2

2,777,088

660,919

32,280

CCTV

18

units

101,250

67,693

20,250

Misc Street Furniture

635

 

1,508,363

657,563

53,682

TOTAL

 

 

 

703,063,905

570,321,205

5,018,012


7.       Financial Forecasts and Development Contributions

Expenditure on assets can be categorised into the following main areas which are discussed below.

Operations and Maintenance

Operation and Maintenance expenditure is required for the day-to-day operation of the network whilst maintaining the current level of service.

Maintenance costs are generally subdivided into:

·      Routine – ongoing day to day maintenance;

·      Planned – Non day to day maintenance that is planned in advance;

·      Reactive – Maintenance that is unexpected.

Renewals

Renewal expenditure includes rehabilitation and replacement of assets to restore an asset to its original level of service.

Capital

Capital works involves the creation of new assets, or works, which upgrade or improve an existing asset beyond its current capacity or performance.

The forecasted subsidised annual expenditure for the next three years is shown in
Table 7.1.

Asset Management Assumptions

·      The forecast are based on current NZ Transport Agency funding thresholds and co-investment levels.

·      Maintenance and operations allocations are largely based on maintaining current level of service.

·      Do not allow for fuel prices or inflation escalation.

·      Staff resources will be available to commission all the actions required.

Table 7.1       Forecasted Subsidised Annual Expenditure

Activity Class

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

Transport planning

$45,000

$70,000

$105,000

Road safety promotion

$90,000

$90,000

$90,000

Walking and cycling facilities

$280,000

$605,100

$570,000

Public transport services

$1,293,300

$1,281,800

$1,332,200

Public transport infrastructure

$69,300

$131,900

$36,000

Maintenance and operation of local roads

$3,135,900

$3,148,600

$3,161,500

Renewal of local roads

$2,691,800

$2,394,800

$2,538,100

New & improved infrastructure for local roads

$650,000

$650,000

$700,000

Total Forecasted Expenditure

$8,255,300

$8,372,200

$8,532,800


Other Significant Sources of Council Funding

·      Rates – in addition to funding from rate payers.  Inner city and Stoke CBD ratepayers pay a higher differential to cover provision of special services in the CBD’s.

·      Parking charges and enforcement.

·      Property rents and land leases.

·      Development Contributions – see below.

·      Borrowing – the Council raises loans to fund capital works only.

·      Depreciation – the Council depreciates its assets according to the replacement value method in order to fund renewal projects and repay Council debt.

Development Contribution

In addressing actual and potential adverse effects from Developments, the Council may seek financial contributions.

This will go towards the necessary land and works to construct, widen or upgrade any new or existing road, where:

·      roads are not available; or

·      existing roads are of inadequate width or construction to cater for increase usage caused by the subdivision or development; or

·      alterations or works to existing roads are required for traffic safety or efficiency as a consequence of the subdivision or development.

Furthermore, a financial contribution may be sought when the full number of on-site parking spaces is not provided as per the Resource Management Plan.

The LTP shows a programme of expected works for the ten years to 2025. This includes yearly financial forecasts of income and expenditure on transport activity operations and renewals and new capital expenditure. The LTP is included in Appendix L. Please note that these figures in this AMP are based on 2015 estimates and do not include inflation. The LTP figures differ beyond year 1 as they do include an allowance for inflation.

 


8.       Risk management

Background

Risk management is the systematic application of management policies and procedures to identify, analysis, evaluate, treat and monitor risk so that injury to people, damage to the environment, financial loss, disruption to infrastructural assets and services and legal obligation failures are controlled and mitigated as far as practicable.

Analysis of Risks

Council’s risk management framework is consistent with the joint Australian New Zealand Standard (AS/NZ IS4360:2004), to ensure that risks are managed on a consistent basis.

Risk, likelihood and consequence are defined as:

·      Risk is a function of the likelihood and consequence of an event occurring;

·      Likelihood is the probability or frequency of an event occurring;

·      Consequence is the outcome of an event including a loss, injury, disadvantage or gain.

For each event the likelihood score (Table 8.1) is multiplied by the consequence score (Table 8.2) for each area of impact. These multiples are then totalled to produce the risk priority rating for the event (Table 8.3), which provides an assessment of the level of risk associated with the event.

Table 8.1       Likelihood Ratings (Semi Qualitative Measure)

Rating

Description

Score